God is Not One

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

By Stephen Prothero (HarperOne, 2010)

In the comparative study of religion, there are two main lines of thought, both of which use the analogy of mountain climbing. One is that all religions take different routes up the same mountain and will meet at the peak, be it God or whatever you call it. The other is that adherents of each religion climb their own mountain. Not only are their paths unique, but the ultimate goal is as well.


Leave Your Sleep

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Natalie Merchant (Nonesuch Records, 2010)


Babies

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Babies directed by Thomas Balmés (Focus Features, 2010)

The Green Zone

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

The Green Zone
Directed by Paul Greengrass (Universal Pictures, 2010)

The Greek dramatist Aeschylus wrote, "In war, truth is the first casualty." But in America's war in Iraq the truth had been slain before the first bombs or boots hit the ground. In director Paul Greengrass' compelling thriller about soldiers looking for weapons of mass destruction, Chief Warrant Officer Roy Miller (Matt Damon) and his men begin to suspect they have been fed a steady diet of lies.


The Jesuit Guide to Almost Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life

By Renée M. LaReau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
The Jesuit Guide to Almost Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life By James Martin, S.J. (HarperOne, 2010)

“Who is St. Ignatius Loyola, what is a Jesuit, and why should you care?” Concise, factual answers to the first two questions can be readily found in James Martin’s book, but it’s his consideration of the third that provides the heft for this guide to all things Jesuit.


Here Lies Love

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

David Byrne and Fatboy Slim (Nonesuch Records, 2010)

I lost interest in David Byrne about 20 years ago. After the Talking Heads, he became a hipster imperialist, pasting his neuroses over the borrowed authenticity of one foreign, non-white culture or another. Call him the poor man’s Paul Simon.


How We Worship: The Eucharist, the Sacraments, and the Hours

By Victoria M. Tufano| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
By Lawrence E. Mick (Liguori Publications, 2009)

The Shroud Codex

By Patrice Fagnant-MacArthur| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
The Shroud Codex by Jerome R. Corsi, Ph.D. (Threshold Editions, 2010)

Pope John-Paul Peter I has a serious headache. Father Paul Bartholomew, a parish priest in New York City, has just resumed his duties after spending three years recovering from a near-fatal accident. Since his return, Bartholomew claims to talk to Jesus directly and has quickly gained a reputation for being able to heal people in the confessional.


The Perfect Game

By Leticia Velasquez| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

The Perfect Game directed by William Dear  (HighRoad Entertainment, 2009) 

When is the last time you saw a great baseball movie--the kind that inspires you to go outside and play ball? How about a rags-to-riches story about the underdogs who made good despite bigotry, poverty, and family drama? When is the last time you saw a film that made your heart swell with pride about being a Latino or belonging to the Catholic Church?


Letters to God

By Leticia Velasquez| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Letters to God (Mercy Creek Entertainment, 2010)

Ever wonder what happens to the letters children mail to Santa? Imagine the dilemma the mailman faces when a confident boy of 8 hands him letters addressed to God.


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