Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion

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Article Reviews

Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion
By Gregory Boyle, S.J. (Free Press, 2010)

While reading the stories of the “homies” that Father Gregory Boyle, S.J. has worked with for the past 20 years at his Homeboy Industries ministry among gang members in Los Angeles, it is easy to forget that these young people probably strike fear in most Americans. They are from the toughest neighborhoods, have shot and killed others, and have done time in prison.


Olivia and the Little Way

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Article Reviews
Olivia and the Little Way by Nancy Carabio Belanger (Harvey House Publishing, 2008)

Olivia and the Little Way is a delightful children's novel about Olivia, a 10-year-old who moves with her family from Texas to Michigan. She is nervous about going to a new school so her grandmother gives her a St. Thérèse chaplet and tells her about the Little Way that St. Thérèse believed in: "You can show your love for God by doing little things for Him with great love."


Toy Story 3

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Directed by Lee Unkrich (Disney/Pixar, 2010)

In the third chapter of Pixar's saga about a boy's toys, the plastic and wooden playthings that fill their owner's toybox face the sad reality that their child-owner has grown up and is heading to college, and they are about to be kicked to the curb like a pair of empty-nester parents.


The Foundling

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Mary Gauthier (Razor and Tie, 2010)

Singer-songwriter extraordinaire Mary Gauthier (“go-shay”) has a voice like a rusty string on a slide guitar. But that never held Bob Dylan back, and in Gauthier’s musical vision, pretty is hardly the point.

That same jarring, unvarnished quality runs through her lyrics. A recovering alcoholic, early in her career Gauthier laid her disease on the line with a song that proclaimed, “fish swim, birds fly . . . I drink.”


The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

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Directed by Niels Arden Oplev (Music Box Films, 2009) 

Fans of the late Stieg Larsson’s crime trilogy (a dark Harry Potter for adult murder mystery fans) will want to see this Swedish-language film tracking the first volume of heroine Lisbeth Salander’s contest with the forces of villainy.
But be warned that Lisbeth is no Nancy Drew, and this is no “cozy” mystery. More hardboiled than Sam Spade or Philip Marlow, Salander makes even Helen Mirren’s Superintendent Detective Jane Tennison seem as quaint as Miss Marple.


Love to Live

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

The Living Sisters (Vanguard, 2010)

Nearly eight years ago in a cramped, dimly lit room illuminated by a few strings of white Christmas lights, I first became acquainted with the music of L.A.-based singer-songwriter Eleni Mandell. She was touring to promote her fifth album, Country for True Lovers.


Your Personal Apostolate: Accepting and Sharing the Love of God

By Carrie MacGillis| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Your Personal Apostolate: Accepting and Sharing the Love of God by Michele Elena Bondi (Joseph Karl Publishing)

Your Personal Apostolate takes you on a beautiful journey of nine key Catholic beliefs, discussing God's love, our journey here on earth, following God's example, faith and much more. The author uses scripture, commentary, personal accounts, and reflection questions to draw the reader in to the concepts she describes so well.


Catherine of Siena: A Passionate Life

By Patrice Fagnant-MacArthur| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Catherine of Siena: A Passionate Life by Don Brophy (Bluebridge, 2010)

Don Brophy's new biography of St. Catherine of Siena is subtitled A Passionate Life. This is truly an appropriate description of how Catherine lived. The Latin root of passion means to suffer or submit. In our modern day English, it implies great intensity of feeling. Catherine lived all these definitions.


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