The Foundling

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Mary Gauthier (Razor and Tie, 2010)

Singer-songwriter extraordinaire Mary Gauthier (“go-shay”) has a voice like a rusty string on a slide guitar. But that never held Bob Dylan back, and in Gauthier’s musical vision, pretty is hardly the point.

That same jarring, unvarnished quality runs through her lyrics. A recovering alcoholic, early in her career Gauthier laid her disease on the line with a song that proclaimed, “fish swim, birds fly . . . I drink.”


The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Directed by Niels Arden Oplev (Music Box Films, 2009) 

Fans of the late Stieg Larsson’s crime trilogy (a dark Harry Potter for adult murder mystery fans) will want to see this Swedish-language film tracking the first volume of heroine Lisbeth Salander’s contest with the forces of villainy.
But be warned that Lisbeth is no Nancy Drew, and this is no “cozy” mystery. More hardboiled than Sam Spade or Philip Marlow, Salander makes even Helen Mirren’s Superintendent Detective Jane Tennison seem as quaint as Miss Marple.


Love to Live

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

The Living Sisters (Vanguard, 2010)

Nearly eight years ago in a cramped, dimly lit room illuminated by a few strings of white Christmas lights, I first became acquainted with the music of L.A.-based singer-songwriter Eleni Mandell. She was touring to promote her fifth album, Country for True Lovers.


Your Personal Apostolate: Accepting and Sharing the Love of God

By Carrie MacGillis| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Your Personal Apostolate: Accepting and Sharing the Love of God by Michele Elena Bondi (Joseph Karl Publishing)

Your Personal Apostolate takes you on a beautiful journey of nine key Catholic beliefs, discussing God's love, our journey here on earth, following God's example, faith and much more. The author uses scripture, commentary, personal accounts, and reflection questions to draw the reader in to the concepts she describes so well.


Catherine of Siena: A Passionate Life

By Patrice Fagnant-MacArthur| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Catherine of Siena: A Passionate Life by Don Brophy (Bluebridge, 2010)

Don Brophy's new biography of St. Catherine of Siena is subtitled A Passionate Life. This is truly an appropriate description of how Catherine lived. The Latin root of passion means to suffer or submit. In our modern day English, it implies great intensity of feeling. Catherine lived all these definitions.


God is Not One

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

By Stephen Prothero (HarperOne, 2010)

In the comparative study of religion, there are two main lines of thought, both of which use the analogy of mountain climbing. One is that all religions take different routes up the same mountain and will meet at the peak, be it God or whatever you call it. The other is that adherents of each religion climb their own mountain. Not only are their paths unique, but the ultimate goal is as well.


Leave Your Sleep

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Natalie Merchant (Nonesuch Records, 2010)


Babies

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Babies directed by Thomas Balmés (Focus Features, 2010)

The Green Zone

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

The Green Zone
Directed by Paul Greengrass (Universal Pictures, 2010)

The Greek dramatist Aeschylus wrote, "In war, truth is the first casualty." But in America's war in Iraq the truth had been slain before the first bombs or boots hit the ground. In director Paul Greengrass' compelling thriller about soldiers looking for weapons of mass destruction, Chief Warrant Officer Roy Miller (Matt Damon) and his men begin to suspect they have been fed a steady diet of lies.


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