USC Book Club: Seeking the Truth of Things

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Article

December 2011:

Seeking the Truth of Things: confessions of a (catholic) philosopher

By Al Gini

Review: While certainly not a textbook, Seeking the Truth of Things introduces some of the world’s greatest thinkers and philosophical concepts. Telling stories on the ground rather than from the fabled ivory tower, Al Gini invites the reader to explore deep questions of meaning without the Philosophy 101 prerequisite.


Book review: At the Supper of the Lamb

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Article Reviews
By Paul Turner (Liturgy Training Publications, 2011)

One thing we can pretty much count on: The changes in the liturgy this Advent will be tough. But the process doesn’t have to be all blood, sweat, and tears. The more folks know about what’s ahead and why the changes are being made, the better off we’ll all be. Which makes resources like Father Paul Turner’s book, subtitled A Pastoral and Theological Commentary on the Mass, indispensible.


Movie review: Forks over Knives

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Directed by Lee Fulkerson (Monica Beach Media, 2011)

USC Book Club: Focolare

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Article

November 2011:

Focolare: Living a Spirituality of Unity in the United States

By Thomas Masters and Amy Uelmen


Space invaders: What's behind our obsession with aliens on the big and little screens?

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration Reviews
Recent films and TV series shine a light on the plight of aliens among us.

Television and movie screens were chock-full of aliens this summer: scary extraterrestrials cast as villainous invaders bent on humanity’s annihilation or hapless intergalactic travelers victimized by our own inhumanity to strangers.


Movie review: Catholicism

By Catherine O'Connell-Cahill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Directed by Matt Leonard (A Word on Fire/Picture Show Films Production, 2011)

Father Robert Barron, a Chicago priest who has appeared often in the pages of this magazine, finally brought his years-in-the-making Catholicism Project to public TV this fall. Up to 70 percent of PBS stations aired or will air four episodes; the series of 10 DVDs is for sale at Wordonfire.org with a companion book and a study guide.


Book Review: Handbook of Saints for Catholic Moms

By Patrice Fagnant-MacArthur| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
A Book of Saints for Catholic Moms
by Lisa M. Hendey
(Ave Maria, 2011)

Lisa Hendey has put together a very inspiring, practical guide to the saints designed especially for Catholic mothers.


Visions of hell: Depictions of hell in art

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Art and Architecture Scripture and Theology

 

Fra Angelico - The Last Judgement (Winged Altar) - Google Art Project
Fra Angelico [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


Book Review: Allah, Liberty, and Love

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
By Irshad Manji
(Free Press, 2011)

The title may catch your eye, but don’t let it fool you. Irshad Manji’s book is not just for and about Muslims. Subtitled “The Courage to Reconcile Faith and Freedom,” it is really about moral courage, or “the willingness to speak truth to power . . . for the sake of a greater good,” as Manji describes the term, relying on Robert F. Kennedy’s definition. In that sense, the book is for all who hope to make the world a better place.


Book Review: Allah, Liberty, and Love

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

The title may catch your eye, but don’t let it fool you. Irshad Manji’s book is not just for and about Muslims. Subtitled “The Courage to Reconcile Faith and Freedom,” it is really about moral courage, or “the willingness to speak truth to power . . . for the sake of a greater good,” as Manji describes the term, relying on Robert F. Kennedy’s definition. In that sense, the book is for all who hope to make the world a better place.


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