We were called Sister

By Joan Sauro, C.S.J.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality Women
Much has changed about religious life but at its heart the mission remains the same.

We were called Immaculata. We were called Concepta. We were called Chrysostom, Eusebius, and Stanislaus, after a Polish boy-saint. We were called Bernard, John, and Thomas after our fathers and Theresa, Elizabeth, and Maureen after our mothers. We were called Paul Kathryn and Robert Rita, pleasing both parents. We were called Serena, signifying calm dispositions. We were called Seraphine, trusting an angelic nature would ensue. We were called Jerome, after a crotchety biblical scholar.


Following Saint Francis in today's world

By John Litwinovich | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
To the well-known saint, the most important human right is the right to love.

We live in a society that highly values perceived rights. People advocate for equal rights, a right to life, a right to die, a right to choose, a right to bear arms and a vast array of other tenets, some of them engraved in our Bill of Rights. Most advocates adorn their righteous causes with cloaks of freedom, fairness, or equality. Many of them are deeply caring and committed in their efforts.


Words fail us: Priests respond to the new Missal a year later

By Scott Alessi| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The new missal has made priests watch their language, but after one year most say the meaning of the Mass is getting lost in translation.

Words fail us: Parishioners respond to the new Missal a year later

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
Reporting straight from the pews after a year of the new translations, U.S. Catholic readers say they are still stumbling through the prayers.  

Stilted, awkward, unnatural, strange, choppy, clumsy, obtuse. If you read these words in a movie review, would you head for the ticket line or run in the opposite direction? What about wooden, tortured, terrible, ridiculous, inaccessible, or abominable? Are you at least intrigued by what could warrant such description? Would you want to check it out once a week?


Who invented the nativity scene?

By Kathleen Manning| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology
If you missed the feast of Francis of Assisi in October, the Christmas season offers another opportunity to commemorate the saint. Anyone who has erected a nativity scene is following Francis’ 13th-century example.

The church in Asia: A place for all peoples

By Edmund Chia and Gemma Tulud Cruz| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Social Justice
Fifty years after the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the church faces new challenges. In this final installment of a three-part series,

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.


Building and sustaining communities in a world of social media

By Verity A. Jones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Spirituality Young Adults
Fifty years after the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the church faces new challenges. In this final installment of a three-part series, Rev. Verity A Jones explains how social media can throw relationships and communities into high relief, including communities of faith.

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.


What is the future of the liturgy?

By Father Anthony Ruff, O.S.B.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
Fifty years after the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the church faces new challenges. In this final installment of a three-part series, Father Anthony Ruff says the best way to defend the church’s liturgical renewal is to celebrate the reformed liturgy as well as possible.

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.


Advance bishop

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Vatican
Moving a bishop should be more than an ecclesiastical game of chess.

Climbing the corporate ladder in our business-driven culture is generally applauded. Who doesn’t want the corner office, the big salary, and the perks of joining the true “company men” (who are still usually men, after all)? Staying in the same job or with the same company for too long can suggest a lack of ambition, and it certainly doesn’t improve one’s marketability.


Good shepherd: Father Stan Rother

By John Rosengren| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

On my first visit to Guatemala, I stayed with a priest who brought me to the neighboring village of Santiago Atitlán, where he told me the story of Father Stan Rother. The American missionary, caught in the middle of Guatemala’s civil war, wound up on a death list because the military government interpreted his charitable acts as subversive. Rother fled back home to Oklahoma for a brief exile but then decided to return to his parish. The pastor could not abandon his flock. “The shepherd cannot run,” he explained to friends.


Pages