Wherever two or three thousand are gathered

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

The 1,200 people who packed Olivet Baptist Church on Chicago's South Side on a chilly Monday evening last December were assured by the event's organizers that the meeting would begin on the dot at 7:30 and last one hour and 15 minutes. They delivered on both counts. This was but one in a series of assemblies sponsored by United Power for Action and Justice, a massive citizens' organization created in 1997. The gathering-a racial rainbow from city and suburbs-included white collar, blue collar, and no collar.


Who moved my tabernacle? The ruckus over renovation

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

There are many issues about which Catholics disagree these days-birth control, divorce and remarriage, sex education in schools, the ordination of women, the rights of homosexuals, the silencing of theologians, to name a few. Yet all these hot buttons cool to relative insignificance compared with one issue capable of generating white hot incandescence among the faithful: church renovation!


Who says the church can't change?

By Christine Gudorf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

There is an Apocryphal story in my family about my great-grandmother Philomena, who died when I was 12 or 13. Great-Grandma was a big TV watcher-soaps, Lawrence Welk, and the evening news-as well as a devout Catholic. When she was in her early 90s, she heard on the news one day that the Vatican, amid preparations for the Second Vatican Council, had just released the conclusions of a study on the historicity of certain saints and had determined that some saints were no longer official saints because of insufficient evidence of their historical existence.


Why sacrifice?

By Christine Gudorf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

Sacrifice was certainly a central factor in the catholic spirituality of my youth. We attended the "sacrifice of the Mass" daily. Sacrifice was not onlystrongly suggested as the appropriate response to the suffering ofothers, as in appeals for the missions or the poor; it was also taught as a good in its own right, as an important part of theprocess of following Jesus Christ. We were encouraged to veneratethose who sacrificed for others, including fathers, who sacrificed intheir jobs to provide for children, and mothers, who sacrificed oftheir time and energy to care for children.


You're holier than you know

By Father Robert Barron| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality

In June of 1997, while on retreat at St. John's Abbey in Collegeville, Minnesota, I had an opportunity to talk at some length with Father Godfrey Diekmann. One of the giants of the liturgical movement in this country and a major player in the shaping of Vatican II's document on the reform of the liturgy, Diekmann was in his upper 80s but his mind, wit, and tongue were as sharp as ever.


Does it pay to work for the church?

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Laypeople who make a living in the church love what they do--but don't always love the pay.

 


Good news in the mission field

By Meinrad Scherer-Emunds| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article **Culture Social Justice

Over the past half-century the Catholic approach to mission has shifted dramatically. Today's Catholic missionaries continue to proclaim the Good News, but most do so in a far more open and respectful encounter and dialogue with the cultures and people they engage. Their witness invites people to a more subtle—and at the same time more profound—"conversion."

Father Josep Maria Abella, the superior general of the Claretians—the missionary congregation that publishes U.S. Catholic—has made the renewal of his order's missionary charism a cornerstone of his leadership.


What would a democratic church look like?

U.S. Catholic| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

The  20TH Century, punctuated by the reforms of Vatican II, has offered hope to the Catholics who would like to see the church renew it's democratic spirit.  But what would "a democratic Catholicism" look like? It would not, could not, look like our modern political process. And not just anyone could run for office. But why not?


Picturing the perfect priest

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Our readers have some strong ideas about how to build a better clergy--from training to ordination requirements to personal traits that make a priest great.

 

All you Priests, Seminanians, and those considering the ordained life out there may want to sit down, put your feet up, and take a deep breath before you read any further. The results of our special survey, "What do you want in a priest?" are in. More than 800 readers and other Catholics weighed in with their opinions, and many of their wish lists make the Easter Vigil look short in comparison.


Do this in memory of me, but do it well

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
In an interview with U.S. Catholic, Bishop Kenneth Edward Untener shared his vision of a nourishing liturgy and united church.

You've written about the busyness in parishes these days. How is that a problem?


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