US Catholic Faith in Real Life

The other Latin Mass

By Elisabeth Román | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Charismatic liturgies, with their lively music, mysticism, and strong community, offer the best of both worlds to Hispanic Catholics looking for a little more oomph in the Mass.

 


Guided tours: Four routes to the ultimate destination

By Renée M. LaReau | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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For the ultimate getaway why not create a customized travel itinerary designed with your spiritual needs in mind? Choose from Ignatian, Benedictine, Carmelite, or Franciscan guides.

 

Like many parents of young children, Ivan Uberti likes to begin his family's supper by saying grace. But in addition to saying a traditional mealtime prayer, Uberti's family takes time for another, less common spiritual practice he learned at his local Jesuit parish.


Come one come all

By Annemarie Scobey and Lisa Calderone-Stewart | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Religious education is not just for kids anymore as more parishes are including the entire family. Even Grandpa's invited. Shortly before Christmas last year, Rachel Squier, 11, of Streetsboro, Ohio announced to her parents that she thought the family should "go visit some poor people."

While Rachel's parents were pleased that their daughter was showing concern for those less fortunate, they knew a discussion was in order.


Closing arguments

By J. Peter Nixon | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Though they agree that sometimes a parish must be closed, U.S. Catholic readers have plenty of suggestions on how the process might be improved.

Under new management

By Father Darren M. Henson and Patrick T. Reardon | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

 

A new pastor's offers suggestions for those preparing the parish welcome wagon.

"You must  be Father Darren. You're our new pastor!" Those were the first words uttered by a couple I had never seen in my life. They excitedly approached me with smiles, wide bug eyes, and extended hands.


Who's the Boss

By Richard R. Gaillardetz | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Authority seems to get a bad rap in the Catholic church. For many it comes with a negative connotation of oppression or suppression. Why is that?

There are examples of abusive authority in the history of the church that have contributed to that. But in fact, if you look at how our ancient tradition understands authority, it's not that simple. We need to place it in a larger context.


Let's watch our language about gays and lesbians

By Father Richard Prendergast | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Official statements calling gays and lesbians "disordered" and "violent" do little to make them feel welcomed and respected in the church. A pastor argues that it's time to stop the name-calling and start treating gays and lesbians as brothers and sisters in Christ.

Let's pray, pay, and have our say

By Richard R. Gaillardetz | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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According to church teaching, all the people of God have the right-duty, even-to share their opinions on matters concerning the good of the church.

 

John Henry Newman was one of the most distinguished. Catholic intellectuals of the 19th century. Already an accomplished theologian within the Church of England, Newman became a figure of national controversy when he decided to become Roman Catholic in 1845.


Knock it out

By A U.S. Catholic interview | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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They say it’s lonely at the top, but it’s also lonely in the middle. That’s where Oblate Father Ronald Rolheiser often finds himself, trying to negotiate a peace between liberals and conservatives in the church.

 

Whether as president of a seminary, where the younger, more conservative students clash with older, more liberal faculty, or as a speaker, columnist, and author, Rolheiser is often seen as a bridge who can see both sides fairly and bring them together.


Battle fatigue

By Robert J. McClory | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Five years into the sex abuse crisis, some Catholics are growing weary, while others are cautiously optimistic.


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