For us and for our salvation?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology
Mel Gibson's The Passion graphically portrayed Christ's death--and perfectly illustrated the traditional doctrine of atonement. But if God uses torture to save, what does that say to victims of violence, and what does it say about God?

How I almost missed Good Friday

By James Philipps| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Philips describes how Easter season often brings feelings of conviction and discomfort over his self-centeredness.



What's so good about Good Friday?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

It's almost as if Mel Gibson's The Passion has come to life. In Chicago's largely Hispanic Pilsen neighborhood, some 7,000 people gather at Providence of God Parish for the beginning of the Via Crucis or "Way of the Cross" every Good Friday. This is no symbolic walk through the park, however; "Pontius Pilate" is dressed in Roman garb, as are the soldiers who accompany "Jesus" the 12 blocks to Harrison Park, where he will be literally tied to a cross.


Kite rite

By Elizabeth Wells| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Looking for a good metaphor for the spiritual journey this Lent and Easter? Go fly a kite!

Are we there yet?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Even Jesus had to spend some time--Holy Saturday to be exact--waiting to see if things were going to work out. In this column from the archives, Bryan Cones explores the importance of the day between Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

What will you be doing April 15?


Three of a kind

By Mary Ann Perga| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
The selfless gift of the Eucharist, the selfless death of Jesus, and the Resurrection are all one great act of love from God.

Lost and found

By Catherine O'Connell-Cahill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Death and life often travel hand in hand on the Christian journey.

Brother's son and his wife just had their first baby, a little boy. His name is Colin David, David being my brother, who died of cancer when his son was only 3 years old.


I could have prayed all night

By Catherine O'Connell-Cahill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Visiting seven churches in the late hours of Holy Thursday is sure to awaken the spirit.

What does the church say about the death penalty?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life
Here's another selection from the GYA archives. Conversation and questions about the death penalty are evergreen and Catholics in a society that permits the state executions as punishment continue to ponder the church's say in this.

About a year ago in central Maine we had three mild earthquakes within a couple of months. They reminded us that our underpinnings are not static, that our planet is still evolving. At present, in the church we also sense a shifting and realigning of the tectonic plates that underlie our moral judgments about the death penalty.


Who decided which books made it into the Bible?

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
The Bible is considered the inspired word of God by the faithful. So you have to wonder: where did it come from?

With all the writings floating around the ancient world, who decided which of them rated as sacred enough to be scripture?

This question is technically one of canonicity. “Canon” means norm or standard. The term was first applied by St. Athanasius to a collection of Jewish and Christian writings around the year 350. A fourth-century bishop of Alexandria, Egypt, Athanasius was a powerhouse.


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