US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Speaking from experience

By Karen Dix| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Latino Catholics: Caught between two worlds

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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It's past time for the U.S. Catholic Church to make Hispanic ministry, especially to second-generation Latinos, a priority in everything we do.

When Catholic parishes notice uncomfortable tensions between parishioners of different backgrounds, one of the people they call in as a “fixer” is University of Notre Dame theologian Timothy Matovina. Parishes that want to get better at dealing with their lack of unity, says this expert on Latino Catholicism, must move away from thinking they should provide a “welcome” to fellow Catholics of other ethnicities.


Back to the drawing board: Should churches be used for more than just Mass?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The religious landscape is shifting. Don’t hunker down—get creative.


The Latino priest shortage and three ways to respond

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The editors of U.S. Catholic interview Timothy Matovina, professor of theology and executive director of the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana.

[Read more from Timothy Matovina on Latino Catholics in the United States.] 


What is the New Evangelization?

By Kevin P. Considine and Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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When Catholics hear the word evangelization, we tend to think of Protestants. This is not surprising. They have been highly visible in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ in their own way.


Brokenness is in the Body of Christ

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The church needs to open its doors to the broken bodies of Christ.

Of all the body parts I didn’t expect my busted knee to affect, it was my eyes. But I’m here to tell you that the first thing that changes when you’re hobbling around is what you see. Specifically, what I see are obstacles: stairs, curbs, uneven pavement, short drops—all of which, if not negotiated properly, result in exquisite little bursts of pain.


How the door was opened for Catholic women theologians

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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If necessity is the mother of invention, it’s fair to say that American Catholic school students in the early 20th century were, in a way, the mothers of Catholic women theologians.


Following Saint Francis in today's world

By John Litwinovich | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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To the well-known saint, the most important human right is the right to love.

We live in a society that highly values perceived rights. People advocate for equal rights, a right to life, a right to die, a right to choose, a right to bear arms and a vast array of other tenets, some of them engraved in our Bill of Rights. Most advocates adorn their righteous causes with cloaks of freedom, fairness, or equality. Many of them are deeply caring and committed in their efforts.


Words fail us: Parishioners respond to the new Missal a year later

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Reporting straight from the pews after a year of the new translations, U.S. Catholic readers say they are still stumbling through the prayers.  

Stilted, awkward, unnatural, strange, choppy, clumsy, obtuse. If you read these words in a movie review, would you head for the ticket line or run in the opposite direction? What about wooden, tortured, terrible, ridiculous, inaccessible, or abominable? Are you at least intrigued by what could warrant such description? Would you want to check it out once a week?


The church in Asia: A place for all peoples

By Edmund Chia and Gemma Tulud Cruz| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Fifty years after the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the church faces new challenges. In this final installment of a three-part series,

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.


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