What is original sin?

By Joel Schorn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

You won’t find the phrase “original sin” in the Bible. The story of humanity’s “fall” in Genesis 1 doesn’t use the term, and St. Paul, one of the church’s earliest theologians, only hints at it in places. After the first century the early church fathers started to define it, but those in the East and West took different approaches.


What women theologians have done for the church

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Women
Catholics can thank women theologians for 70 years of building up the church.

What is original sin?

By Joel Schorn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

You won’t find the phrase “original sin” in the Bible. The story of humanity’s “fall” in Genesis 1 doesn’t use the term, and St. Paul, one of the church’s earliest theologians, only hints at it in places. After the first century the early church fathers started to define it, but those in the East and West took different approaches.


Ordination, past and present: An interview with Gary Macy

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology Women
Our understanding of priests, bishops, and deacons has changed dramatically in the church's long history, says historian Gary Macy.

Ordination, past and present: An interview with Gary Macy

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology Women
Our understanding of priests, bishops, and deacons has changed dramatically in the church's long history, says historian Gary Macy.

How the door was opened for Catholic women theologians

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Women

If necessity is the mother of invention, it’s fair to say that American Catholic school students in the early 20th century were, in a way, the mothers of Catholic women theologians.


How the door was opened for Catholic women theologians

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Women

If necessity is the mother of invention, it’s fair to say that American Catholic school students in the early 20th century were, in a way, the mothers of Catholic women theologians.


Get the facts in order: A history of women's leadership

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Women

After giving one of the three plenary addresses on the Eucharist at a gathering of the Catholic Theological Society of America in 1997, church historian Gary Marcy and two theologians were lambasted in an article for Commonweal by Cardinal Avery Dulles. Macy’s address suggested that in the Middle Ages, women may have presided at communion ceremonies. Dulles did not approve.


Get the facts in order: A history of women's leadership

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Women

After giving one of the three plenary addresses on the Eucharist at a gathering of the Catholic Theological Society of America in 1997, church historian Gary Marcy and two theologians were lambasted in an article for Commonweal by Cardinal Avery Dulles. Macy’s address suggested that in the Middle Ages, women may have presided at communion ceremonies. Dulles did not approve.


God willing: Watch what you say when others are suffering

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Sex and Sexuality Spirituality Women

When tragedy hits, think twice before claiming what God intended.

Of the many issues that drove last November’s election, few might have guessed that “God’s will” would become a major spoiler in the Indiana Senate race. When GOP candidate Richard Mourdock suggested that a life created through rape is “something God intended,” it cost him an easy path to victory. But while pundits and Democrats were quick to make as much political hay as possible out of Mourdock’s gaffe, only a few commentators, theologians, and pastors took it on.


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