Road scholar

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
St. Paul may be known as the "apostle to the Gentiles," but his high ideals make him an apostle for believers today, too.

 

When you ask Father Jerome Murphy-O'Connor why he studies St. Paul, you get a simple, down-to-earth answer: "He gave me my start, and that got me my job." The start was a doctoral thesis on Paul's approach to preaching, which eventually landed Murphy-O'Connor a position at Jerusalem's prestigious École Biblique, where he has taught New Testament for the past 40 years while lecturing on every corner of the globe as well.


Not just lip service: Reciting the Creed

By Father Robert Barron| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
Every Sunday many Catholics mumble their way through the recitation of what we believe. Doesn't the Creed deserve to be proclaimed with a little more gusto?

 


Who's the Boss

By Richard R. Gaillardetz| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
  
Authority seems to get a bad rap in the Catholic church. For many it comes with a negative connotation of oppression or suppression. Why is that?

There are examples of abusive authority in the history of the church that have contributed to that. But in fact, if you look at how our ancient tradition understands authority, it's not that simple. We need to place it in a larger context.


Knock it out

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Politics Scripture and Theology
They say it’s lonely at the top, but it’s also lonely in the middle. That’s where Oblate Father Ronald Rolheiser often finds himself, trying to negotiate a peace between liberals and conservatives in the church.

 

Whether as president of a seminary, where the younger, more conservative students clash with older, more liberal faculty, or as a speaker, columnist, and author, Rolheiser is often seen as a bridge who can see both sides fairly and bring them together.


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