Borderline Christianity

By Moises Sandoval| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration

During Mass each Wednesday at Casa Juan Diego in Houston, immigrants speak of not eating for days, having nothing to drink for a week, seeing people die of thirst or because they drank irrigation water with chemicals in it.


The Creed: Do you believe what you just said?

By R. Scott Appleby| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology

I once knew a young priest, an affable fellow and gifted liturgist, who nonetheless had the annoying habit of omitting the Creed when he presided at Mass. On one occasion when I served as lector and he as presider, he explained to me privately his aversion to the profession of faith.


The Creed: Do you believe what you just said?

By R. Scott Appleby| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology

I once knew a young priest, an affable fellow and gifted liturgist, who nonetheless had the annoying habit of omitting the Creed when he presided at Mass. On one occasion when I served as lector and he as presider, he explained to me privately his aversion to the profession of faith.


What in Hell Can We Believe?

By Lawrence Cunningham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

As a child I have a vivid memory of thumbing through a large book owned my grandfather that riveted my attention. It was a collection of the illustrations done by the 19th-century artist and illustrator Gustave Doré for an edition of Dante's Divine Comedy. I would love to report that Doré's depiction of paradise enthralled me, but the truth is I spent most of my time looking at the punishments suffered by those in hell.


What in Hell Can We Believe?

By Lawrence Cunningham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

As a child I have a vivid memory of thumbing through a large book owned my grandfather that riveted my attention. It was a collection of the illustrations done by the 19th-century artist and illustrator Gustave Doré for an edition of Dante's Divine Comedy. I would love to report that Doré's depiction of paradise enthralled me, but the truth is I spent most of my time looking at the punishments suffered by those in hell.


Who says the church can't change?

By Christine Gudorf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

There is an Apocryphal story in my family about my great-grandmother Philomena, who died when I was 12 or 13. Great-Grandma was a big TV watcher-soaps, Lawrence Welk, and the evening news-as well as a devout Catholic. When she was in her early 90s, she heard on the news one day that the Vatican, amid preparations for the Second Vatican Council, had just released the conclusions of a study on the historicity of certain saints and had determined that some saints were no longer official saints because of insufficient evidence of their historical existence.


Why sacrifice?

By Christine Gudorf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

Sacrifice was certainly a central factor in the catholic spirituality of my youth. We attended the "sacrifice of the Mass" daily. Sacrifice was not onlystrongly suggested as the appropriate response to the suffering ofothers, as in appeals for the missions or the poor; it was also taught as a good in its own right, as an important part of theprocess of following Jesus Christ. We were encouraged to veneratethose who sacrificed for others, including fathers, who sacrificed intheir jobs to provide for children, and mothers, who sacrificed oftheir time and energy to care for children.


Why sacrifice?

By Christine Gudorf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

Sacrifice was certainly a central factor in the catholic spirituality of my youth. We attended the "sacrifice of the Mass" daily. Sacrifice was not onlystrongly suggested as the appropriate response to the suffering ofothers, as in appeals for the missions or the poor; it was also taught as a good in its own right, as an important part of theprocess of following Jesus Christ. We were encouraged to veneratethose who sacrificed for others, including fathers, who sacrificed intheir jobs to provide for children, and mothers, who sacrificed oftheir time and energy to care for children.


You're holier than you know

By Father Robert Barron| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality

In June of 1997, while on retreat at St. John's Abbey in Collegeville, Minnesota, I had an opportunity to talk at some length with Father Godfrey Diekmann. One of the giants of the liturgical movement in this country and a major player in the shaping of Vatican II's document on the reform of the liturgy, Diekmann was in his upper 80s but his mind, wit, and tongue were as sharp as ever.


What would a democratic church look like?

U.S. Catholic| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

The  20TH Century, punctuated by the reforms of Vatican II, has offered hope to the Catholics who would like to see the church renew it's democratic spirit.  But what would "a democratic Catholicism" look like? It would not, could not, look like our modern political process. And not just anyone could run for office. But why not?


Pages