A tale of two Gregorys

U.S. Catholic| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

With the middle ages came the imperial papacy, the rise of powerful feudal lords with secular interests, and a contest over who ultimately controlled the ministers and other resources of the church. Lost in the shuffle was any notion that ordinary Christians might have a privileged voice in the proceedings.


A theology of call -- How to be Good News to others

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Young Adults

Sister Catherine Bertrand, S.S.N.D. entered religious life on a dare. "It was either that or the Peace Corps." After 25 years she continues to be surprised by all that her life has to offer, and she dares all Christians to respond to the gospel call to fidelity and commitment--whether they are single, married, religious men and women, or ordained priests.

According to Bertrand, every vocation involves asking yourself the questions, "How are you Good News to others? How do you bring life? And how do you share that life?"


A theology of call -- How to be Good News to others

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Young Adults

Sister Catherine Bertrand, S.S.N.D. entered religious life on a dare. "It was either that or the Peace Corps." After 25 years she continues to be surprised by all that her life has to offer, and she dares all Christians to respond to the gospel call to fidelity and commitment--whether they are single, married, religious men and women, or ordained priests.

According to Bertrand, every vocation involves asking yourself the questions, "How are you Good News to others? How do you bring life? And how do you share that life?"


Buyer's guide to the Good Book

By Peter Gilmour| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

He thought it would be easy to buy a Bible, a birthday gift for a godchild. The bookseller directed him to section 41. There he found more than 35 linear feet of shelving stocked with myriad editions of the Bible. Like cereals lining the aisle of a huge grocery store, the variety was overwhelming.

This would-be purchaser of a gift Bible returned home empty-handed. Worse yet, he felt empty-headed. He knew the Bible was central to his Christianity. When faced with making an intelligent selection of a specific edition of the Bible, however, he froze.


Buyer's guide to the Good Book

By Peter Gilmour| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

He thought it would be easy to buy a Bible, a birthday gift for a godchild. The bookseller directed him to section 41. There he found more than 35 linear feet of shelving stocked with myriad editions of the Bible. Like cereals lining the aisle of a huge grocery store, the variety was overwhelming.

This would-be purchaser of a gift Bible returned home empty-handed. Worse yet, he felt empty-headed. He knew the Bible was central to his Christianity. When faced with making an intelligent selection of a specific edition of the Bible, however, he froze.


Cafeteria Catholics

By Father Jack Rathschmidt| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Spirituality

On vacation last summer, I quietly joined a small country parish for Sunday Eucharist. Relieved at not having to preside at two or three liturgies, I settled among the worshipers, looking forward to listening, singing, and praying. Trying not to look directly at the priest for fear he would think I was staring, I concentrated on being among God's people, not leading them.


Catholic dissent: When wrong turns out to be right

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
How dissenters from Galileo to John Courtney Murray have helped the church to see more clearly.

Dissentt! It is not a nice word. It makes you think of other "dis" words like disagreement, dissension, disobedience, and disgrace. There's no doubt that Catholic Church officials down through the centuries have taken a dim view of dissent, whether it was dissent from official doctrine or dissent from the orders of a legitimately appointed church superior. And, as recent directives from the Vatican indicate, the view is getting dimmer still.


Chronological list of the Doctors of the Church

U.S. Catholic| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

SAINT AMBROSE (c. 340-397), BISHOP OF MILAN, Italy, a major opponent of Arianism, wrote and preached extensively [named a Doctor of the church, 1298].

Saint Augustine of Hippo (c. 354-430), North African bishop, author of Confessions, City of God, and numerous treatises, countered heretical movements, one of the most influential theologians of the Western church, called "Doctor of Grace" [1298].


Chronological list of the Doctors of the Church

U.S. Catholic| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

SAINT AMBROSE (c. 340-397), BISHOP OF MILAN, Italy, a major opponent of Arianism, wrote and preached extensively [named a Doctor of the church, 1298].

Saint Augustine of Hippo (c. 354-430), North African bishop, author of Confessions, City of God, and numerous treatises, countered heretical movements, one of the most influential theologians of the Western church, called "Doctor of Grace" [1298].


Desperately seeking Sophia

By Joyce Rupp| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

At a retreat where I referred to Sophia several times in my first presentation, a man suddenly stood up and blurted out: "Just who is this Sophia? Stop assuming that everyone here knows who you are talking about!" His interruption startled me, and it reminded me that many do not know this jewel in scripture, that Sophia is hidden from many.


Pages