Sketch by Andre Chappaz of then-Father Ratzinger from 1973 story in U.S. Catholic

Ratzinger on the record

Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

This is an article that appeared in the October 1973 issue of U.S. Catholic. We are publishing it as part of our 75th anniversary celebration.

Lost in the Shouting: The Meaning of Vatican II
By Desmond O'Grady

At the time of the second Vatican Council, it was said the bishops were learning their two R's: Rahner and Ratzinger.


Five questions with Karen Armstrong

Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue

Watch our "5 questions" interview with religious scholar Karen Armstrong in which she share a piece of her personal faith journey.

For more from Armstrong about the study of religion, atheism, science, and history, read our complete interview with her, How not to talk about God.


Certifiably Catholic

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Our place in the church isn't determined by politics or policy.

If there's one lesson Americans can take from the last 12 months of our political life, it's that something called "bipartisanship" is long dead and buried. If the recent national debate on health care is an indication, anyone "reaching across the aisle" is most likely trying to punch the person in the opposite chair.


Did God cause the earthquake in Haiti?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

When horrible things happen in the world, it's natural to seek an explanation. Explanations offer a sense of control and meaning in situations that seem devoid of both. The devastation in Haiti caused by the January earthquake has left many asking, "Why did this happen?" Answering that question can be confusing and difficult when we consider our faith in an all-loving and all-powerful God.


Did God cause the earthquake in Haiti?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

When horrible things happen in the world, it's natural to seek an explanation. Explanations offer a sense of control and meaning in situations that seem devoid of both. The devastation in Haiti caused by the January earthquake has left many asking, "Why did this happen?" Answering that question can be confusing and difficult when we consider our faith in an all-loving and all-powerful God.


What is heresy?

By Michael Cameron| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

The ancient Greek word hairesis meant “choice” and identified one’s intellectual “choice” among the many philosophies of late antiquity. The word originally carried no negative judgment. But Judaism and Christianity insisted that certain core ideas about the nature of God and his saving work were non-negotiable.  


What is heresy?

By Michael Cameron| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

The ancient Greek word hairesis meant “choice” and identified one’s intellectual “choice” among the many philosophies of late antiquity. The word originally carried no negative judgment. But Judaism and Christianity insisted that certain core ideas about the nature of God and his saving work were non-negotiable.  


When bishops brawled: An interview with Philip Jenkins

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Have you ever had a fist fight about the natures of Christ? If you have, you would fit right in among ancient Christians, says this church historian.

Christians today may take it on faith that Jesus has both human and divine natures, but any church historian will tell you that in the early church the question sparked a wild and even deadly debate that lasted for centuries, centering on three church councils in the mid-400s.


When bishops brawled: An interview with Philip Jenkins

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Have you ever had a fist fight about the natures of Christ? If you have, you would fit right in among ancient Christians, says this church historian.

Christians today may take it on faith that Jesus has both human and divine natures, but any church historian will tell you that in the early church the question sparked a wild and even deadly debate that lasted for centuries, centering on three church councils in the mid-400s.


A tale of two visitations: Biblical and apostolic

By Fran Ferder| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Women
The apostolic visitation of women religious should reflect the Biblical visitation between Mary and Elizabeth.

The word visitation has a rich biblical heritage. Familiar to most Christians as the time when Mary and Elizabeth meet, greet, and talk to one another before the births of their sons, this biblical Visitation throbs with the energy of women's voices pregnant with life and hope.


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