The trouble with angels

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
These celestial beings are elusive and mysterious—but totally necessary.

Once upon a time I believed in angels. Then I got older and gave up childish ways. Then I got even older and became a child again. Once more I believe in angels. You may be presently too old to put your faith in such creatures; or not yet old enough. Wherever you stand on the "angel issue," you've got company.


The trouble with angels

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
These celestial beings are elusive and mysterious—but totally necessary.

Once upon a time I believed in angels. Then I got older and gave up childish ways. Then I got even older and became a child again. Once more I believe in angels. You may be presently too old to put your faith in such creatures; or not yet old enough. Wherever you stand on the "angel issue," you've got company.


Bible quiz, genius edition

By Alice Camille and Father Paul Boudreau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
If you score a passing grade with "Who wants to be a Bible Scholar" in U.S. Catholic's October 2010 issue, give some extra credit questions a try. The answers, ranging from curious to implausible, may not be what you expect.

1. Who killed Goliath?
A. Elhanan
B. Saul
C. Samuel
D. Abner

2. How many of each animal did Noah's take on the ark?
A. Two
B. Nine
C. Twelve
D. Fourteen


Bible quiz, genius edition

By Alice Camille and Father Paul Boudreau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
If you score a passing grade with "Who wants to be a Bible Scholar" in U.S. Catholic's October 2010 issue, give some extra credit questions a try. The answers, ranging from curious to implausible, may not be what you expect.

1. Who killed Goliath?
A. Elhanan
B. Saul
C. Samuel
D. Abner

2. How many of each animal did Noah's take on the ark?
A. Two
B. Nine
C. Twelve
D. Fourteen


Does the church still ban books?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
What do Jean Paul Sartre, Voltaire, Immanuel Kant, John Milton, and Galileo have in common?

Required reading for university freshmen? Maybe.


Does the church still ban books?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
What do Jean Paul Sartre, Voltaire, Immanuel Kant, John Milton, and Galileo have in common?

Required reading for university freshmen? Maybe.


The great awakening: How lay people have shaken up the church

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Scripture and Theology
The Second Vatican Council unleashed a wave of lay participation in the church—and there’s no turning back.

Joan Higgins remembers when things began to change at her San Francisco parish. "It was 1968," she says. "We had a new young pastor who was very forward-looking. He turned around the altar, moved the tabernacle to one side, and instituted a moment of collective silence for reflection after communion." The young priest also introduced another innovation: a parish council.


How does church teaching change?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

Every doctrine or practice familiar to Catholics has a history of its own, and some official expressions of church teaching are quite recent, such as the dogmas of the Immaculate Conception (1854) and Assumption of Mary (1950). That doctrine is slow to become official or may even change has to do with the nature of divine revelation: By definition, it is God’s self-giving, and God cannot be fully captured by any human expression.


How does church teaching change?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

Every doctrine or practice familiar to Catholics has a history of its own, and some official expressions of church teaching are quite recent, such as the dogmas of the Immaculate Conception (1854) and Assumption of Mary (1950). That doctrine is slow to become official or may even change has to do with the nature of divine revelation: By definition, it is God’s self-giving, and God cannot be fully captured by any human expression.


Vocational school: Sister Katarina Schuth on seminaries

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Vatican
Having taught in and studied seminaries for 20 years, Katarina Schuth sizes up the changes in today's seminaries and the men they are forming for the priesthood.

Karatina Schuth didn't set out to study seminaries. With a doctoral degree in cultural geography, she had researched literacy in rural India, taught at a Minnesota college, and studied moral theology. Her work on seminaries initially just fell into her lap, she says.


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