Mary, Mary, quite contrary

By Elizabeth Johnson| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Women

Defying the stereotypes of a meek, mild-mannered Mary, the Magnificat proclaims the liberating and revolutionary message of a passionate, prophetic woman. In her new book, Elizabeth A. Johnson takes a critical look at Mary-who she is and what she represents in the 21st century.


Road Scholar

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

St. Paul may be known as the "apostle to the Gentiles," but his high ideals make him an apostle for believers today, too.

When you ask Father Jerome Murphy-O'Connor why he studies St. Paul, you get a simple, down-to-earth answer: "He gave me my start, and that got me my job." The start was a doctoral thesis on Paul's approach to preaching, which eventually landed Murphy-O'Connor a position at Jerusalem's prestigious École Biblique, where he has taught New Testament for the past 40 years while lecturing on every corner of the globe as well.


Glad You Asked: How did Jesus found the church?

By Kevin Considine| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
While they are obviously connected, the link between Jesus and the church as we know it today isn’t exactly clear.

The Jesus movement of the first century was a group of mostly Jewish followers who were of little social importance and who often met in homes—a far cry from the cathedrals we know and love today. The pope today claims universal ecclesial authority, and because the Vatican is a nation-state, he is a head of state and even has diplomats. Jesus was certainly not a head of state and did not have diplomats (and neither did his disciple Peter).


Glad You Asked: How did Jesus found the church?

By Kevin Considine| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
While they are obviously connected, the link between Jesus and the church as we know it today isn’t exactly clear.

The Jesus movement of the first century was a group of mostly Jewish followers who were of little social importance and who often met in homes—a far cry from the cathedrals we know and love today. The pope today claims universal ecclesial authority, and because the Vatican is a nation-state, he is a head of state and even has diplomats. Jesus was certainly not a head of state and did not have diplomats (and neither did his disciple Peter).


Let's get a big bang out of science

By Father Richard G. Malloy, S.J.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Faith and Science Scripture and Theology
Far from being a threat to faith, modern science is an invitation to get better  acquainted with the force behind the universe.

How can you believe in evolution?” a Christian woman accuses me. I explain that I don’t believe in evolution. I accept evolution as a scientific theory in the same way I accept the theory of gravity.

In 2006 National Geographic News reported that only 14 percent of Americans thought evolution is “definitely true.” Around 30 percent reject the idea entirely. Only people in Turkey have a lower rate of acceptance of Darwin’s discoveries.


Change we can believe in: The pope, condoms, and church teaching

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality Social Justice Vatican
Church teaching is the same always and everywhere—except when it isn’t.

Using the words “pope” and “condom” in the same sentence is bound to draw attention; when it’s the pope himself using the latter word in a sentence of his own, the world takes notice.


Dig in: What it means to be Catholic

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Spirituality
It’s OK if you don’t like beets. There’s a dish for every taste on the Catholic table.

Jesus must have enjoyed eating. If his opponents called him “a glutton and a drunkard,” we can only guess that he loved a good dinner party. The scandal he caused, however, had less to do with what he ate than with whom: “tax collectors and sinners.”


Is there salvation outside the church?

By John Switzer| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue Scripture and Theology
Can my Buddhist husband be saved? What about my Jewish neighbors and my sister-in-law who is an atheist?

An ancient doctrine says extra ecclesiam nulla salus ("outside the church there is no salvation"), so how does this affect those who are not Christian? You may be surprised that the doctrine still holds, but this doesn't mean that salvation is unavailable to those of other religions or of no religion at all.


Is there salvation outside the church?

By John Switzer| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue Scripture and Theology
Can my Buddhist husband be saved? What about my Jewish neighbors and my sister-in-law who is an atheist?

An ancient doctrine says extra ecclesiam nulla salus ("outside the church there is no salvation"), so how does this affect those who are not Christian? You may be surprised that the doctrine still holds, but this doesn't mean that salvation is unavailable to those of other religions or of no religion at all.


Deacons' wives' tales

By Anna Weaver| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Scripture and Theology Women
Dung Tran remembers attending the annual Los Angeles Religious Education Congress several years ago and being struck by a particular scene.

"The deacons would go into the sacristy and vest with the priests, but they would come out holding hands with their wives," he says. "There's obviously a big difference there between priests and deacons."


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