Can a Catholic receive communion in a Protestant church?

By Kevin Considine| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue Scripture and Theology
Should you pass on communion at a Lutheran church or participate fully?

You are at the wedding of a beloved family member or friend, which is taking place at a Lutheran church. You gladly accepted the invitation to celebrate this happy day with the bride and groom. But then there is a call to come to the table of the Lord’s Supper, to receive communion. This is the awkward moment you knew was coming. Can you, and should you, a practicing Catholic, accept the invitation?


Was Jesus a know-it-all?

By Joel Schorn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
“But about that day and hour no one knows,” Jesus said in talking about his return at the end of time, “neither the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father” (Matt. 24:36). Note: That’s the Son talking.

Or how about in the Gospel of Luke where the story of Jesus’ childhood ends with the words, “And Jesus increased in wisdom and in years” (Luke 2:52).


Rerum roots: A brief history of American Catholic support for unions

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Social Justice
Cardinal James Gibbons' support for the Knights of Labor in the late 19th century helped lay the groundwork for Rerum Novarum.

U.S. cardinal should get some credit for being an impetus for Rerum Novarum, the first papal encyclical that spoke to the rights of workers.


Why isn't transubstantiation in the creed?

By John Switzer| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Vatican
When considering the Catholic Church, perhaps nothing stands out so obviously as the Mass.

Eucharist, according to the Second Vatican Council, is both the “source and summit” of Christian life. Using bread and wine, at Mass we celebrate a communal sharing of the true presence of the risen Christ in these elements, which change from bread and wine into this sacrament of Christ. This is known as transubstantiation, a theological term used by Latin (Western) Christians, and it is a central belief of the Roman Catholic Church. So why does the creed make no mention of it?


Why isn't transubstantiation in the creed?

By John Switzer| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Vatican
When considering the Catholic Church, perhaps nothing stands out so obviously as the Mass.

Eucharist, according to the Second Vatican Council, is both the “source and summit” of Christian life. Using bread and wine, at Mass we celebrate a communal sharing of the true presence of the risen Christ in these elements, which change from bread and wine into this sacrament of Christ. This is known as transubstantiation, a theological term used by Latin (Western) Christians, and it is a central belief of the Roman Catholic Church. So why does the creed make no mention of it?


Right before your very eyes: Alice Camille on the Transfiguration

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Alice Camille reflects on the Transfiguration of Jesus Christ. She suggests that the Transfiguration should lead Catholic Christians to see that fullness in the face of others.

She spoke little English -- just isolated words you had to build the intended sentence around in your mind. But it never seemed to get in the way of our conversation. Mrs. Sottopietra was the oldest human being I'd ever seen, though every old person seems a hundred from the perspective of a child.


Right before your very eyes: Alice Camille on the Transfiguration

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Alice Camille reflects on the Transfiguration of Jesus Christ. She suggests that the Transfiguration should lead Catholic Christians to see that fullness in the face of others.

She spoke little English -- just isolated words you had to build the intended sentence around in your mind. But it never seemed to get in the way of our conversation. Mrs. Sottopietra was the oldest human being I'd ever seen, though every old person seems a hundred from the perspective of a child.


What is the Catechism of the Catholic Church?

By Santiago Cortes-Sjoberg| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
When we talk about “the catechism” today we are most likely referring to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, promulgated by Pope John Paul II in 1992 to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council.

The times they were a'changing: Mark Massa on the Catholic '60s

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Vatican
A church historian explains why the events of the 1960s still echo through the church 40 years later.

Mark Massa, S.J. was 14 years old on the First Sunday of Advent, 1964, when Catholics across the country arrived at Mass to find the priest facing them across the altar and—even more jarring—speaking in English and expecting them to respond. The disappearing Latin Mass was but the first of many old certainties that would be blown up during the next few years.


Is there a list of infallible teachings?

By Kevin Considine| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Most Catholics have a pet list of teachings that they wish would be declared infallibly, or ex cathedra (from the Chair of Peter). Odds are that these often revolve around hot-button issues like women’s ordination, gay marriage, or the reform of the liturgy.

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