Why do we anoint the sick?

By Victoria M. Tufano| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
One of the great mysteries of our faith is the incarnation, our core belief that the eternal and almighty God became a human being, a man who could and did suffer just as we do.

During his ministry on earth, Jesus had a particular concern for sick people; he healed them not just with a word of power, but also with a human and compassionate touch.


Why do we anoint the sick?

By Victoria M. Tufano| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
One of the great mysteries of our faith is the incarnation, our core belief that the eternal and almighty God became a human being, a man who could and did suffer just as we do.

During his ministry on earth, Jesus had a particular concern for sick people; he healed them not just with a word of power, but also with a human and compassionate touch.


Is Dia de los Muertos the same as All Souls Day?

By Joel Schorn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology

For three days every year Mexicans and Mexican Americans gather for Día de los Muertos. In cemeteries and homes people come together to remember their deceased loved ones. The last of those days, November 2, falls on the traditional Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed—All Souls Day. Are the two celebrations the same?


Does the church have any "mothers"?

By Michael Cameron| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology Women
Writers on the early church speak often of "Church "Fathers," but were there any "Church Mothers"?

Because of the cultural situation of the time, women wrote little and wielded power even less, so it's hard to speak of "Church Mothers" in the same way we do the "Fathers." Nevertheless, many ancient Christian women were known for their heroic faith as martyrs, spiritual guides, teachers, and, of course, mothers. They were often commended for their unique purity of life, their inner strength, and even their "virile" courage.


Does the church have any "mothers"?

By Michael Cameron| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology Women
Writers on the early church speak often of "Church "Fathers," but were there any "Church Mothers"?

Because of the cultural situation of the time, women wrote little and wielded power even less, so it's hard to speak of "Church Mothers" in the same way we do the "Fathers." Nevertheless, many ancient Christian women were known for their heroic faith as martyrs, spiritual guides, teachers, and, of course, mothers. They were often commended for their unique purity of life, their inner strength, and even their "virile" courage.


When do the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ?

By James Field| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The question of exactly when the eucharistic gifts become Christ's Body and Blood has commanded attention and debate for centuries.

From the supper at Emmaus, disciples have cherished the Eucharist as the clearest sign of the Risen Lord's abiding presence.


When do the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ?

By James Field| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The question of exactly when the eucharistic gifts become Christ's Body and Blood has commanded attention and debate for centuries.

From the supper at Emmaus, disciples have cherished the Eucharist as the clearest sign of the Risen Lord's abiding presence.


Why can't Catholics wed outdoors?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
Of the four wedding invitations currently posted on my refrigerator, only one is for a ceremony to be held in a church.

The others? All will be outdoors: in a hotel garden, under a restaurant gazebo, or in a park. The beauty of God's creation seems a perfect setting for making a lifetime commitment. So why doesn't the Catholic Church allow couples to get married outside?


Why can't Catholics wed outdoors?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
Of the four wedding invitations currently posted on my refrigerator, only one is for a ceremony to be held in a church.

The others? All will be outdoors: in a hotel garden, under a restaurant gazebo, or in a park. The beauty of God's creation seems a perfect setting for making a lifetime commitment. So why doesn't the Catholic Church allow couples to get married outside?


Why does the priest pour water into the wine and put a piece of the bread into the cup?

By David Philippart| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
Both actions are very ancient and began as practical necessities, but eventually the necessities disappeared and were even forgotten.

Later when Christians started to ask what these two gestures meant, they began to interpret the actions symbolically. While these symbols may never have been intended in the beginning, the better ones made sense and became part of our rich tradition.


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