For God so loved the cosmos

By Elizabeth Johnson| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Scripture and Theology Spirituality
When the Word became flesh, all creation was drawn into the divine embrace. 

In our day concerns about ecology are rising. Climate change, pollution, and extinction of plant and animal species make us question harmful human treatment of the natural world.


What's your sign? Searching for an Easter symbol

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology Spirituality
Though the cross reigns over Good Friday, Easter's mystery needs a symbol of its own. 

I don't usually think of Jesus' crucifixion when passing the sweets table, but there it was: A big rich dark chocolate cake adorned with white sugary latticework in the shape of-you guessed it-a cross.


Famous last words

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology
Seven prominent religious and community leaders from different Christian traditions reflect on Jesus' Seven Last Words from the cross.

The final words of a dying person are precious to those left behind. When time is short, one has a chance to speak only of the most important things--love, forgiveness, faith. The last words are often the summation of a life, cherished and pondered long after the loved one has died. The final testament of a human life can be known in these words.


For us and for our salvation?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology
Mel Gibson's The Passion graphically portrayed Christ's death--and perfectly illustrated the traditional doctrine of atonement. But if God uses torture to save, what does that say to victims of violence, and what does it say about God?

What does the church say about the death penalty?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life
Here's another selection from the GYA archives. Conversation and questions about the death penalty are evergreen and Catholics in a society that permits the state executions as punishment continue to ponder the church's say in this.

About a year ago in central Maine we had three mild earthquakes within a couple of months. They reminded us that our underpinnings are not static, that our planet is still evolving. At present, in the church we also sense a shifting and realigning of the tectonic plates that underlie our moral judgments about the death penalty.


Who decided which books made it into the Bible?

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
The Bible is considered the inspired word of God by the faithful. So you have to wonder: where did it come from?

With all the writings floating around the ancient world, who decided which of them rated as sacred enough to be scripture?

This question is technically one of canonicity. “Canon” means norm or standard. The term was first applied by St. Athanasius to a collection of Jewish and Christian writings around the year 350. A fourth-century bishop of Alexandria, Egypt, Athanasius was a powerhouse.


Who decided which books made it into the Bible?

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
The Bible is considered the inspired word of God by the faithful. So you have to wonder: where did it come from?

With all the writings floating around the ancient world, who decided which of them rated as sacred enough to be scripture?

This question is technically one of canonicity. “Canon” means norm or standard. The term was first applied by St. Athanasius to a collection of Jewish and Christian writings around the year 350. A fourth-century bishop of Alexandria, Egypt, Athanasius was a powerhouse.


GYA: Why are some deacons married?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Celibacy isn't required for all clergy.

Last year, with the creation of the personal ordinariate for Anglicans, more people became aware of the presence of married clergy in the Catholic Church. Long known for its celibate priesthood, many media outlets began covering the church with profiles of these former Anglican priests who were to become Catholic priests despite having wives and children—the very thing other clergy, like Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Gabino Zavala, have lost their jobs over.


GYA: Why are some deacons married?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Celibacy isn't required for all clergy.

Last year, with the creation of the personal ordinariate for Anglicans, more people became aware of the presence of married clergy in the Catholic Church. Long known for its celibate priesthood, many media outlets began covering the church with profiles of these former Anglican priests who were to become Catholic priests despite having wives and children—the very thing other clergy, like Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Gabino Zavala, have lost their jobs over.


Does the church tell me how to vote?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Scripture and Theology
This Glad You Asked column from six years ago shows that every election season, Catholics are wondering about the relationship between their church and politics.

"I believe in an America where... there is no Catholic vote, no anti-Catholic vote," declared John F. Kennedy. But today some wonder whether U.S. Catholic bishops are trying to create a political bloc by telling Catholics how to cast their ballots.


Pages