What does the church say about the death penalty?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life
Here's another selection from the GYA archives. Conversation and questions about the death penalty are evergreen and Catholics in a society that permits the state executions as punishment continue to ponder the church's say in this.

About a year ago in central Maine we had three mild earthquakes within a couple of months. They reminded us that our underpinnings are not static, that our planet is still evolving. At present, in the church we also sense a shifting and realigning of the tectonic plates that underlie our moral judgments about the death penalty.


Who decided which books made it into the Bible?

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
The Bible is considered the inspired word of God by the faithful. So you have to wonder: where did it come from?

With all the writings floating around the ancient world, who decided which of them rated as sacred enough to be scripture?

This question is technically one of canonicity. “Canon” means norm or standard. The term was first applied by St. Athanasius to a collection of Jewish and Christian writings around the year 350. A fourth-century bishop of Alexandria, Egypt, Athanasius was a powerhouse.


Who decided which books made it into the Bible?

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
The Bible is considered the inspired word of God by the faithful. So you have to wonder: where did it come from?

With all the writings floating around the ancient world, who decided which of them rated as sacred enough to be scripture?

This question is technically one of canonicity. “Canon” means norm or standard. The term was first applied by St. Athanasius to a collection of Jewish and Christian writings around the year 350. A fourth-century bishop of Alexandria, Egypt, Athanasius was a powerhouse.


GYA: Why are some deacons married?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Celibacy isn't required for all clergy.

Last year, with the creation of the personal ordinariate for Anglicans, more people became aware of the presence of married clergy in the Catholic Church. Long known for its celibate priesthood, many media outlets began covering the church with profiles of these former Anglican priests who were to become Catholic priests despite having wives and children—the very thing other clergy, like Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Gabino Zavala, have lost their jobs over.


GYA: Why are some deacons married?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Celibacy isn't required for all clergy.

Last year, with the creation of the personal ordinariate for Anglicans, more people became aware of the presence of married clergy in the Catholic Church. Long known for its celibate priesthood, many media outlets began covering the church with profiles of these former Anglican priests who were to become Catholic priests despite having wives and children—the very thing other clergy, like Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Gabino Zavala, have lost their jobs over.


Does the church tell me how to vote?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Scripture and Theology
This Glad You Asked column from six years ago shows that every election season, Catholics are wondering about the relationship between their church and politics.

"I believe in an America where... there is no Catholic vote, no anti-Catholic vote," declared John F. Kennedy. But today some wonder whether U.S. Catholic bishops are trying to create a political bloc by telling Catholics how to cast their ballots.


Does the church tell me how to vote?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Scripture and Theology
This Glad You Asked column from six years ago shows that every election season, Catholics are wondering about the relationship between their church and politics.

"I believe in an America where... there is no Catholic vote, no anti-Catholic vote," declared John F. Kennedy. But today some wonder whether U.S. Catholic bishops are trying to create a political bloc by telling Catholics how to cast their ballots.


Heavenly bodies: Are we souls, bodies, or both?

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Spirituality
Flesh and blood deserve equal billing with spirit and soul when talking about human nature.

The children next door are sidewalk theologians—in their spare time, of course. Modern children lead unnaturally busy lives. They go to school five days a week and attend Sunday school on weekends. They have an exhaustive activities schedule coordinated by their parents. And they also play, among the most sobering and time-consuming responsibilities of childhood.


Pride and prejudice: A history of the relationship between gay and lesbian Catholics and their church

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality

1969: Dignity, the first group for gay and lesbian Catholics, is founded. The Stonewall Riots, considered the beginning of the gay rights movement, follow a police raid on a gay bar in Greenwich Village.

1973: The American Psychiatric Association votes to remove homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual.

1974: The National Federation of Priests Councils and the National Coalition of American Nuns adopts a platform supporting the “civil rights of homosexual persons.”


Pride and prejudice: The uneasy relationship between gays and lesbians and their church

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Sex and Sexuality
As church leaders turn up the volume on same-sex marriage, gay and lesbian Catholics find themselves wondering just where they stand in their church.

On a clear, windy Sunday in March 2010, Father William Breslin told his parishioners at Sacred Heart of Jesus in Boulder, Colorado why the parish school would not re-enroll a child of same-sex parents for the coming school year.


Pages