GYA: Why are some deacons married?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Celibacy isn't required for all clergy.

Last year, with the creation of the personal ordinariate for Anglicans, more people became aware of the presence of married clergy in the Catholic Church. Long known for its celibate priesthood, many media outlets began covering the church with profiles of these former Anglican priests who were to become Catholic priests despite having wives and children—the very thing other clergy, like Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Gabino Zavala, have lost their jobs over.


Does the church tell me how to vote?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Scripture and Theology
This Glad You Asked column from six years ago shows that every election season, Catholics are wondering about the relationship between their church and politics.

"I believe in an America where... there is no Catholic vote, no anti-Catholic vote," declared John F. Kennedy. But today some wonder whether U.S. Catholic bishops are trying to create a political bloc by telling Catholics how to cast their ballots.


Does the church tell me how to vote?

By Jim Dinn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Scripture and Theology
This Glad You Asked column from six years ago shows that every election season, Catholics are wondering about the relationship between their church and politics.

"I believe in an America where... there is no Catholic vote, no anti-Catholic vote," declared John F. Kennedy. But today some wonder whether U.S. Catholic bishops are trying to create a political bloc by telling Catholics how to cast their ballots.


Heavenly bodies: Are we souls, bodies, or both?

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Spirituality
Flesh and blood deserve equal billing with spirit and soul when talking about human nature.

The children next door are sidewalk theologians—in their spare time, of course. Modern children lead unnaturally busy lives. They go to school five days a week and attend Sunday school on weekends. They have an exhaustive activities schedule coordinated by their parents. And they also play, among the most sobering and time-consuming responsibilities of childhood.


Pride and prejudice: A history of the relationship between gay and lesbian Catholics and their church

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality

1969: Dignity, the first group for gay and lesbian Catholics, is founded. The Stonewall Riots, considered the beginning of the gay rights movement, follow a police raid on a gay bar in Greenwich Village.

1973: The American Psychiatric Association votes to remove homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual.

1974: The National Federation of Priests Councils and the National Coalition of American Nuns adopts a platform supporting the “civil rights of homosexual persons.”


Pride and prejudice: The uneasy relationship between gays and lesbians and their church

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Sex and Sexuality
As church leaders turn up the volume on same-sex marriage, gay and lesbian Catholics find themselves wondering just where they stand in their church.

On a clear, windy Sunday in March 2010, Father William Breslin told his parishioners at Sacred Heart of Jesus in Boulder, Colorado why the parish school would not re-enroll a child of same-sex parents for the coming school year.


The mamas and the papas: What it's like for Catholic parents of GLBT children

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality
Parents have much to say about the church and their children.

The young priest preached on the sanctity of life at a Denver hospice. Afterward an older couple asked him if their son, who had died of AIDS, would be in hell forever. The priest said he couldn’t answer that.

More than 20 years later Shawn Reynolds still remembers the anguish on the couple’s faces. “He didn’t say anything about Christ’s love,” Reynolds says.


When do the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ?

By Father James Field| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The question of exactly when the eucharistic gifts become Christ's Body and Blood has commanded attention and debate for centuries.

From the supper at Emmaus, disciples have cherished the Eucharist as the clearest sign of the Risen Lord's abiding presence.


When do the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ?

By Father James Field| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The question of exactly when the eucharistic gifts become Christ's Body and Blood has commanded attention and debate for centuries.

From the supper at Emmaus, disciples have cherished the Eucharist as the clearest sign of the Risen Lord's abiding presence.


Do you hear the cry of the poor? Liberation theology today

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Social Justice
Though it grew up in Latin America, liberation theology continues to have lessons for the faithful north of the border. 

People who think of "liberation theology" as a 1960s fad should get to know Fordham University Professor Michael Lee, one of a new generation of Catholic theologians.

Lee's faith was transformed when he put it to work among the poor after college, and liberation theology gave him a way to think about his experience. Now he uses it to help undergrads understand the connection between faith and the needs of the world.


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