Dads behaving badly: A closer look at the fathers in the Bible

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
In this first installment of a two-part meditation, we are reminded of Abraham's "daddy issues." Even this exalted father of faith had a rocky start.

Lorenzo Monaco (circa 1370(1370)–circa 1425(1425)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


Male and Female, God created them

By Susan A. Ross| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Sex and Sexuality Women
Rethinking John Paul II's theology of the body.

Take a closer look: Lectio Divina

By Sister Sheryl Frances Chen | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
There's more to praying with scripture than the words on the page.

At my 30th class reunion, one of the lectures offered was by a young psychologist doing cognitive research. He showed us a three-minute video, and our task was to watch two basketball teams, one in white uniforms and one in black, and count the number of straight passes and the number of bounce passes made by the team in white.


Glad You Asked: Why do we go to confession?

By Victoria M. Tufano| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology

The very word confession conjures up all kinds of stories and images, but those who go to confession know that it is a source of holy comfort and blessed relief. Confession is a gift, a means of grace, a way to God, and a way back to God.

This sacrament originated early in the church’s life, when it became clear that those who had been baptized were not immune to sin. Lesser sins were considered to be forgiven through prayer, fasting, works of mercy, and participation in the Eucharist. Greater sins needed more.


Glad You Asked: Why do we go to confession?

By Victoria M. Tufano| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology

The very word confession conjures up all kinds of stories and images, but those who go to confession know that it is a source of holy comfort and blessed relief. Confession is a gift, a means of grace, a way to God, and a way back to God.

This sacrament originated early in the church’s life, when it became clear that those who had been baptized were not immune to sin. Lesser sins were considered to be forgiven through prayer, fasting, works of mercy, and participation in the Eucharist. Greater sins needed more.


The greatest story ever sold

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
The Bible comes in every size, color, and translation. But before   you get to the check-out line, check out our guide on how to find the one that’s right for you.

Are you well versed in the Bible?

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Respondents to a U.S. Catholic survey on the Bible are confident when it comes to scripture, but even they recommend reading the Good Book with knowledgeable guides to show you around biblical times and places.

The latest fad in The self-help aisle at your local bookstore claims to reveal the centuries-old “secret” that positive thinking leads to the good life: “As you learn The Secret, you will come to know how you can have, be, or do anything you want. . . . You will come to know the true magnificence that awaits you in life.”


Putting Paul in his place: Examining the apostle through the eyes of a classicist

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Though some may see him as the grump of the New Testament, St. Paul is full of surprises.

What’s the connection between St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians and the second-century Roman novelist Apuleius’s comedy The Golden Ass? More than you might think, says classicist Sarah Ruden in her book Paul Among the People (Image). Ruden, who specializes in ancient Greek and Roman literature, became interested in the preconceptions modern readers bring to Paul’s writing when she began studying the apostle herself.


Do Catholics believe in life on other planets?

By Kevin Considine| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Faith and Science Scripture and Theology
Jesus is the savior of humanity, but what that mean if we discovered alien life forms?

In a 1995 episode of the popular TV drama The X-Files, FBI agent Fox Mulder—a true believer in extraterrestrial life—has a quick exchange with his partner Dana Scully, the rational scientist and devoted skeptic. He asks, “Are you familiar with the Ten Commandments?”

“You want me to recite them?” Scully responds. Mulder says, “Just . . . the one about the Sabbath. The part where God made heaven and earth but didn’t bother to tell anyone about his side projects.”


Putting Paul in his place: Examining the apostle through the eyes of a classicist

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Though some may see him as the grump of the New Testament, St. Paul is full of surprises.

What’s the connection between St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians and the second-century Roman novelist Apuleius’s comedy The Golden Ass? More than you might think, says classicist Sarah Ruden in her book Paul Among the People (Image). Ruden, who specializes in ancient Greek and Roman literature, became interested in the preconceptions modern readers bring to Paul’s writing when she began studying the apostle herself.


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