Rise to the occasion: The many ways to celebrate Easter

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Saints, Feasts, and Seasons


Were you there?

By Brian Doyle| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Let the slow, poignant shuffle begin--the Veneration of the Cross.

A priest prone, his face to the floor, his arms stretched like broken wings. The chapel silent and expectant. Thorny-voiced Isaiah: "He was despised and forsaken; he was pierced for our transessions; he was crushed for our iniquities." Then the voices from all around the chapel-the young priest near the altar, a girl high in the balcony, a boy in a deep dark corner:

"What is truth?" says Pilate.

"Hail, King of the Jews."


What's your sign? Searching for an Easter symbol

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology Spirituality
Though the cross reigns over Good Friday, Easter's mystery needs a symbol of its own. 

I don't usually think of Jesus' crucifixion when passing the sweets table, but there it was: A big rich dark chocolate cake adorned with white sugary latticework in the shape of-you guessed it-a cross.


What's your sign? Searching for an Easter symbol

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology Spirituality
Though the cross reigns over Good Friday, Easter's mystery needs a symbol of its own. 

I don't usually think of Jesus' crucifixion when passing the sweets table, but there it was: A big rich dark chocolate cake adorned with white sugary latticework in the shape of-you guessed it-a cross.


Via dolorosa: Walking the Stations of the Cross while on chemo

By Janine Denomme| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Spirituality
When you're on chemo, the Stations of the Cross take on a whole new meaning. 

Growing up Catholic in the 1970s, I remember the older women in our parish staying after Mass and praying before the Stations of the Cross. They would walk silently and slowly, stopping to pray at each of the 14 depictions of Jesus' final hours. I learned to think of the stations in the same way I thought of the rosary: They were for old people, a throwback to a pre-Vatican II time, and they held no meaning for me.


A moveable feast

By Renée M. LaReau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
A Polish Catholic would be a basket case without this annual blessing of Easter goodies.

A moveable feast

By Renée M. LaReau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
A Polish Catholic would be a basket case without this annual blessing of Easter goodies.

Stay with me

By Miguel Arias| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
By grieving with the Blessed Mother, we comfort all mothers who mourn.

In my hometown of San José de Gracia in Jalisco, Mexico, church celebrations marked the pace of our lives. Though liturgical reform took time to arrive, the practices of popular Catholicism kept our faith alive and active. These celebrations belonged to the people—to our mothers and fathers, to our ancestors, and to our rezanderos (laypeople who lead the prayer).


Stay with me

By Miguel Arias| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
By grieving with the Blessed Mother, we comfort all mothers who mourn.

In my hometown of San José de Gracia in Jalisco, Mexico, church celebrations marked the pace of our lives. Though liturgical reform took time to arrive, the practices of popular Catholicism kept our faith alive and active. These celebrations belonged to the people—to our mothers and fathers, to our ancestors, and to our rezanderos (laypeople who lead the prayer).


Feet first

By Gabe Huck| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
We kick off the Easter Triduum with a tradition that helps to keep our faith sure-footed.

When the church gathers on the night of Holy Thursday, its business is to leave the 40 days of Lent and enter the Triduum, the three days at the heart of the Catholic community’s life. So whether Lent has been strenuous or a disaster, we leave it behind on this Thursday evening. Ready or not, we begin the Triduum.


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