Via dolorosa: Walking the Stations of the Cross while on chemo

By Janine Denomme| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Spirituality
When you're on chemo, the Stations of the Cross take on a whole new meaning. 

Growing up Catholic in the 1970s, I remember the older women in our parish staying after Mass and praying before the Stations of the Cross. They would walk silently and slowly, stopping to pray at each of the 14 depictions of Jesus' final hours. I learned to think of the stations in the same way I thought of the rosary: They were for old people, a throwback to a pre-Vatican II time, and they held no meaning for me.


A moveable feast

By Renée M. LaReau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
A Polish Catholic would be a basket case without this annual blessing of Easter goodies.

A moveable feast

By Renée M. LaReau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
A Polish Catholic would be a basket case without this annual blessing of Easter goodies.

Stay with me

By Miguel Arias| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
By grieving with the Blessed Mother, we comfort all mothers who mourn.

In my hometown of San José de Gracia in Jalisco, Mexico, church celebrations marked the pace of our lives. Though liturgical reform took time to arrive, the practices of popular Catholicism kept our faith alive and active. These celebrations belonged to the people—to our mothers and fathers, to our ancestors, and to our rezanderos (laypeople who lead the prayer).


Stay with me

By Miguel Arias| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
By grieving with the Blessed Mother, we comfort all mothers who mourn.

In my hometown of San José de Gracia in Jalisco, Mexico, church celebrations marked the pace of our lives. Though liturgical reform took time to arrive, the practices of popular Catholicism kept our faith alive and active. These celebrations belonged to the people—to our mothers and fathers, to our ancestors, and to our rezanderos (laypeople who lead the prayer).


Feet first

By Gabe Huck| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
We kick off the Easter Triduum with a tradition that helps to keep our faith sure-footed.

When the church gathers on the night of Holy Thursday, its business is to leave the 40 days of Lent and enter the Triduum, the three days at the heart of the Catholic community’s life. So whether Lent has been strenuous or a disaster, we leave it behind on this Thursday evening. Ready or not, we begin the Triduum.


Feet first

By Gabe Huck| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
We kick off the Easter Triduum with a tradition that helps to keep our faith sure-footed.

When the church gathers on the night of Holy Thursday, its business is to leave the 40 days of Lent and enter the Triduum, the three days at the heart of the Catholic community’s life. So whether Lent has been strenuous or a disaster, we leave it behind on this Thursday evening. Ready or not, we begin the Triduum.


Lip service

By Gabe Huck| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
The liturgy of Good Friday gathers believers of every generation before the Tree of Life.

hose of us in our 60s and beyond remember something like this from our youthful Good Fridays: After what seemed like an eternity of Latin readings (mostly John’s account of the Passion), followed by another eternity (during which the interesting part was seeing if you could actually get both knees on the kneeler before the pastor semi-chanted, “Levate”), we got something more than words: a procession.


Lip service

By Gabe Huck| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
The liturgy of Good Friday gathers believers of every generation before the Tree of Life.

hose of us in our 60s and beyond remember something like this from our youthful Good Fridays: After what seemed like an eternity of Latin readings (mostly John’s account of the Passion), followed by another eternity (during which the interesting part was seeing if you could actually get both knees on the kneeler before the pastor semi-chanted, “Levate”), we got something more than words: a procession.


Famous last words

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology
Seven prominent religious and community leaders from different Christian traditions reflect on Jesus' Seven Last Words from the cross.

The final words of a dying person are precious to those left behind. When time is short, one has a chance to speak only of the most important things--love, forgiveness, faith. The last words are often the summation of a life, cherished and pondered long after the loved one has died. The final testament of a human life can be known in these words.


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