Photo by D Sharon Pruitt

Baby's first Holy Week

By Ginny Kubitz Moyer| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
A first-time mom sees Easter anew through the eyes of her infant son.

For Lent last year, I gave up Easter. To be more precise, I gave up the Easter and Holy Week services that I love.

I wish I could say that this was a voluntary sacrifice, but it wasn't. It was the inevitable outcome of becoming a mom and realizing that your child's needs trump your own wishes. Mid-Lent, it occurred to me that my 6-month-old son, Matthew, would not take to my beloved Holy Week events with the same enthusiasm that I do.


Conscientious courage

By Michael Hovey| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Franz Jägerstätter paved the way for those who object to war by following a higher order.

In April 1974, while serving at the U.S. Navy base in Sasebo, Japan, I visited the Atomic Bomb Memorial Museum in the nearby city of Nagasaki, the second city destroyed by an atomic bomb dropped by U.S. forces.


What I learned about justice from Dorothy Day

By Jim Forest| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Social Justice War and Peace

What kind of impact did influential Catholic reformer Dorothy Day have on those who knew her best? A friend and former colleague gives his personal perspective on the woman whom many consider the most important American Catholic of the 20th century.

Jim Forest began his association with Dorothy Day in 1961, when he moved to New York City to join the Catholic Worker community there. A recent convert to Catholicism, he had been discharged from the U.S. Navy as a conscientious objector.


What I learned about justice from Dorothy Day

By Jim Forest| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Social Justice War and Peace

What kind of impact did influential Catholic reformer Dorothy Day have on those who knew her best? A friend and former colleague gives his personal perspective on the woman whom many consider the most important American Catholic of the 20th century.

Jim Forest began his association with Dorothy Day in 1961, when he moved to New York City to join the Catholic Worker community there. A recent convert to Catholicism, he had been discharged from the U.S. Navy as a conscientious objector.


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