A pilgrim’s way home

By Ana María Pineda, R.S.M.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

Twenty-five years after Archbishop Romero's assassination, one Salvadoreña visits people and places that carry on his message.

Ana María Pineda, R.S.M.

In the evening of March 24, 1980, Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero of El Salvador was shot and killed while celebrating Mass in the chapel on the grounds of Divine Providence hospital. His enemies rejoiced while the poor of El Salvador wept.


Do you take your values Christmas shopping?

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Social Justice

What parent doesn't want to make their children's wishes come true at Christmas, to see their little eyes light up as they tear off the wrapping paper on Christmas morning? But for many parents-and grandparents and other relatives-playing Santa has become an ethical landmine.

For instance, what do you do when your 3-year-old wants a Beetle Borg?


How I almost missed Good Friday

By James Philipps| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

It must have been about the time I was chopping up the melon for my one-and-a-half-year-old daughter's breakfast that the angst set in. Here it was Good Friday, and I hadn't done a single liturgical or sacramental thing during the entire expanse of Lent despite the best of intentions that I had at the beginning of the season.


Preferred providers

By Lawrence Cunningham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

Thenaming in 1997 of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux as a "Doctor of the church" by Pope John Paul II caused Catholics around the world to ask what the term means, what its history is, and what the significance of the title is, both for the one honored and for theCatholic tradition in general.


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By Lawrence Cunningham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

Thenaming in 1997 of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux as a "Doctor of the church" by Pope John Paul II caused Catholics around the world to ask what the term means, what its history is, and what the significance of the title is, both for the one honored and for theCatholic tradition in general.


The trouble with Saint Dorothy

By Jim Forest| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Can you think of a word that describes a person who devoted much of her life to being with people many of us cross the street to avoid? Who for half a century did her best to make sure they didn't go hungry or freeze on winter nights? Who went to Mass every day until her legs couldn't take her that far, at which point Communion was brought to her? Who prayed every day for friend and enemy alike, and whose prayers, some are convinced, had miraculous results? Who went to Confession every week? Who was devoted to the rosary? Who wore hand-me-downs and lived in cold-waterflats?


They did it their way

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

Your book All Saints tells the stories of a broad range of saints-some officially canonized and some not, some Catholic or Christian, some not. How did you select whom to include?

 


They did it their way

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons

Your book All Saints tells the stories of a broad range of saints-some officially canonized and some not, some Catholic or Christian, some not. How did you select whom to include?

 


Who picks the holy days of obligation?

By Victoria M. Tufano| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology

Holy days of obligation-days when Catholics are required to celebrate Eucharist-are a result of tradition, devotion, and church law, and their number has varied according to history and place.

Before the mid-17th century, individual bishops could determine what holy days would be observed in their diocese. This resulted in vastly different church calendars from diocese to diocese and a huge number of holy days.


If Lent is 40 days, why are there 46 days between Ash Wednesday and Easter?

By David Philippart| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology

"The 40 days of Lent" has always been more of a metaphor than a literal count. Over the course of history the season of preparation for Easter Sunday has ranged from one day (in the first century) to 44 (today in the Roman church). Officially since 1970, Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and ends at sunset on Holy Thursday.


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