Fake it till you make it: St. Genesius, patron of actors

By Dan Cawthon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
St. Genesius isn’t just the patron of high school thespians. We can all learn something about acting like Christ from this legendary actor.

Anyone who was a member of a Catholic high school or college drama club during the 1950s and ’60s no doubt knows about St. Genesius—the patron saint of actors. According to legend, he was an actor during the reign of the Roman Emperor Diocletian in the third century. To win the emperor’s favor, he took on a role satirizing a Christian about to be baptized.


Fake it till you make it: St. Genesius, patron of actors

By Dan Cawthon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
St. Genesius isn’t just the patron of high school thespians. We can all learn something about acting like Christ from this legendary actor.

Anyone who was a member of a Catholic high school or college drama club during the 1950s and ’60s no doubt knows about St. Genesius—the patron saint of actors. According to legend, he was an actor during the reign of the Roman Emperor Diocletian in the third century. To win the emperor’s favor, he took on a role satirizing a Christian about to be baptized.


The other Irish saint

By Karen Rushen O’Brien| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Raise a pint and air out your linens—St. Brigid is coming.

Early in our marriage my husband, Stephen, an Irish immigrant to the United States, was having trouble sleeping. He was happy enough with his new life in Chicago, but a combination of culture shock concerning all things American and simply missing the familiar ways of his homeland left him vaguely restless and disoriented, a state that appeared to manifest itself most powerfully at night, once the lights went out and the noise of the day died away.


The other Irish saint

By Karen Rushen O’Brien| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Raise a pint and air out your linens—St. Brigid is coming.

Early in our marriage my husband, Stephen, an Irish immigrant to the United States, was having trouble sleeping. He was happy enough with his new life in Chicago, but a combination of culture shock concerning all things American and simply missing the familiar ways of his homeland left him vaguely restless and disoriented, a state that appeared to manifest itself most powerfully at night, once the lights went out and the noise of the day died away.


Great teacher: Albert the Great

By Edwin P. Christmann| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
Eight centuries ago Albert the Great showed how theology and science
can walk hand in hand.

I teach graduate students how to teach math and science. On the first day of each semester, I ask, “Who can tell me something about Albertus Magnus, Albert the Great?” Students usually avoid making eye contact.


Doctor’s orders

By Karen Scott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
To cure the maladies of both the medieval church and spiritual seekers today, Doctor of the Church Catherine of Siena prescribes meditating on Christ’s passion.

I first met Caterina Benincasa, better known as St. Catherine of Siena, during a trip to her hometown in Italy. I was a college student trying to figure out how to become Catholic and still have a good relationship with my non-Christian family. I had spent that happy summer program in Florence studying Renaissance history, discovering the beauty of religious art, and falling in love with God.


Doctor’s orders

By Karen Scott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
To cure the maladies of both the medieval church and spiritual seekers today, Doctor of the Church Catherine of Siena prescribes meditating on Christ’s passion.

I first met Caterina Benincasa, better known as St. Catherine of Siena, during a trip to her hometown in Italy. I was a college student trying to figure out how to become Catholic and still have a good relationship with my non-Christian family. I had spent that happy summer program in Florence studying Renaissance history, discovering the beauty of religious art, and falling in love with God.


Don't trash our past: An interview with Robert Orsi on the history of devotions

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Spirituality
In honor of the Feast of Saint Jude, we've dug up this interview with Robert Orsi from 2005 about the history of devotions--devotion to St. Jude being among the most popular.

Orsi is the Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America at Harvard Divinity School. His latest book, Between Heaven and Earth: The Religious Worlds People Make and the Scholars Who Study Them (Princeton) follows Thank You, St. Jude (Yale) and The Madonna of 115th Street (Yale).


Don't trash our past: An interview with Robert Orsi on the history of devotions

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Spirituality
In honor of the Feast of Saint Jude, we've dug up this interview with Robert Orsi from 2005 about the history of devotions--devotion to St. Jude being among the most popular.

Orsi is the Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America at Harvard Divinity School. His latest book, Between Heaven and Earth: The Religious Worlds People Make and the Scholars Who Study Them (Princeton) follows Thank You, St. Jude (Yale) and The Madonna of 115th Street (Yale).


Jude didn’t let them down

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Spirituality
For his book, Thank You, St. Jude, Robert Orsi researched devotion to St. Jude, patron of difficult or hopeless causes, which has been fostered by the Claretians since the 1920s through the National Shrine of St. Jude.


Why has the St. Jude devotion flourished while other devotions have died out?


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