Old habits die hard: The clothes of yore interest young religious

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality Young Adults
Around the time Karen Lueck entered the Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in 1967, the community had decided to forgo its traditional habit. “Many people who had worn the habit were glad to get out of it,” she says. “They felt it kept them on a pedestal, apart from the people.”

The order reconsidered the issue several times during the 1970s and eventually reached a compromise: A few sisters chose to wear a modified habit, and the vast majority—including Lueck—opted for simple, professional clothing. (All sisters wear the order’s medal and ring.)


Born-again Catholics: Evangelicals crossing the Tiber

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality Young Adults
Former denizens of evangelical arenas are finding new homes in the age-old sanctuaries of Catholicism.

It took Mark Shea four tries to become a Catholic.

Raised without any religious instruction, Shea had embraced evangelical Christianity as a college student at the University of Washington in the late 1970s. “There was a little non-denominational group that came together on the dorm floor next to mine,” Shea says. “We got together for Bible study, Saturday night praise and worship, that sort of thing.”


Born-again Catholics: Evangelicals crossing the Tiber

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality Young Adults
Former denizens of evangelical arenas are finding new homes in the age-old sanctuaries of Catholicism.

It took Mark Shea four tries to become a Catholic.

Raised without any religious instruction, Shea had embraced evangelical Christianity as a college student at the University of Washington in the late 1970s. “There was a little non-denominational group that came together on the dorm floor next to mine,” Shea says. “We got together for Bible study, Saturday night praise and worship, that sort of thing.”


Many nations under God: Multicultural liturgies

By Amy Kiley| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
Parishes cross barriers of language and culture to make their Sunday celebrations more inclusive.

When Gini Eagen came to Corpus Christi Catholic Church in Stone Mountain, Georgia three decades ago, the parish had “a very white population,” she says. Now Eagen is the church’s pastoral associate, and things have changed. “We are today the Catholic Church I used to picture in my prayer life,” she says. “When you’re young and you hear that there are people all over the world saying the same prayers that you say, you can picture it, but this is the reality we can see on Sunday.”


Learn your lines: How parishes are preparing for the new Mass

By Jeff Parrott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
It’s dress rehearsal time as parishes prepare for the new Mass.

It was last Advent season when Andy Hentz first heard his pastor talk about the new Latin-to-English translations coming to the Mass. But it wasn’t until Hentz, a mail carrier who reads Catholic magazines and listens to Catholic radio, read excerpts of the new texts on the Internet earlier this year that he realized how dramatic the changes will be.


Learn your lines: How parishes are preparing for the new Mass

By Jeff Parrott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
It’s dress rehearsal time as parishes prepare for the new Mass.

It was last Advent season when Andy Hentz first heard his pastor talk about the new Latin-to-English translations coming to the Mass. But it wasn’t until Hentz, a mail carrier who reads Catholic magazines and listens to Catholic radio, read excerpts of the new texts on the Internet earlier this year that he realized how dramatic the changes will be.


To change or not to change: Responding to the new Mass

By Jeff Parrott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
American Catholics who still strongly dislike the new liturgical texts once they are implemented this Advent season will have three options:

1. Stop going to church.

2. Keep attending but stop participating fully in Mass.

3. Attend, participate, and learn to live with them.


To change or not to change: Responding to the new Mass

By Jeff Parrott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
American Catholics who still strongly dislike the new liturgical texts once they are implemented this Advent season will have three options:

1. Stop going to church.

2. Keep attending but stop participating fully in Mass.

3. Attend, participate, and learn to live with them.


Sing a new song: New music for the new Mass

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
Anyone who’s seen The King’s Speech, about King George VI and his speech therapist, knows people don’t stutter when they sing. So will singing similarly help Mass-goers with the words of the new missal translation?

Composer Steven Warner says yes. Singing will keep people from slipping back into the familiar words of the old translation. He sings a demonstration of the new “The Lord be with you” and its response, “And with your spirit.”


Sing a new song: New music for the new Mass

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
Anyone who’s seen The King’s Speech, about King George VI and his speech therapist, knows people don’t stutter when they sing. So will singing similarly help Mass-goers with the words of the new missal translation?

Composer Steven Warner says yes. Singing will keep people from slipping back into the familiar words of the old translation. He sings a demonstration of the new “The Lord be with you” and its response, “And with your spirit.”


Pages