Glad You Asked: What is the Liturgy of the Hours?

By Joel Schorn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The Liturgy of the Hours is a small but bulky and intimidating-looking red-bound prayer book with lots of confusing multicolored ribbons. It is that, but of course it’s much more.



Take a closer look: Lectio Divina

By Sister Sheryl Frances Chen | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
There's more to praying with scripture than the words on the page.

At my 30th class reunion, one of the lectures offered was by a young psychologist doing cognitive research. He showed us a three-minute video, and our task was to watch two basketball teams, one in white uniforms and one in black, and count the number of straight passes and the number of bounce passes made by the team in white.


Om-schooled: How Yoga can influence your Catholic prayer

By M.M. Hubele| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality
Catholics can take a lesson from the Hindu tradition of yoga when it comes to praying with body, mind, and spirit.

Walking into the dark chapel, gothic arches soaring overhead and didactic glass staining the pews with jewel-toned light, I tried to calm my mind. Papers, classes, work, broken relationships, my future. The thoughts sparked in rapid succession, a finale-on-the-Fourth-of-July-show in my mind. I dropped a knee to the cold floor, blessed myself, and slumped into the nearest pew.


Glad You Asked: Why do we go to confession?

By Victoria M. Tufano| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology

The very word confession conjures up all kinds of stories and images, but those who go to confession know that it is a source of holy comfort and blessed relief. Confession is a gift, a means of grace, a way to God, and a way back to God.

This sacrament originated early in the church’s life, when it became clear that those who had been baptized were not immune to sin. Lesser sins were considered to be forgiven through prayer, fasting, works of mercy, and participation in the Eucharist. Greater sins needed more.


Rise to the occasion: The many ways to celebrate Easter

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Saints, Feasts, and Seasons


Let's invite gay and lesbian Catholics to a church wedding

By Dwight Daniels| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Sex and Sexuality
In this 1997 article that accompanies the one above, one Catholic argues that same-sex marriage would allow the church to encourage more loving, nurturing, and lasting relationships.

The time has come for the Catholic Church to invite gay and lesbian Catholics to the celebration of Matrimony. Such an invitation would have a positive impact on the lives of many gay and lesbian Catholics and would be equally beneficial for the life and health of the institutional church.


When do the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ?

By Father James Field| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The question of exactly when the eucharistic gifts become Christ's Body and Blood has commanded attention and debate for centuries.

From the supper at Emmaus, disciples have cherished the Eucharist as the clearest sign of the Risen Lord's abiding presence.


Bring remarried Catholics back to the table

By Father Paul M. Zulehner| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology

Editors’ note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Hold the applause: Save the praise for God alone

By Gregory F. Augustine Pierce| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.

We’re all part of the Body of Christ, so why are a select few soaking up all the attention at Mass?

At the end of the Christmas Eve Mass at my parish last year, the pastor said, “We’re going to have to sing one more song before we leave.” I looked at my wife, Kathy, and whispered, “Oh, no. They’re going to sing ‘Happy Birthday’ to Jesus.”


What are novenas?

By Santiago Cortes-Sjoberg| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology Spirituality
For 16 years I prayed them with my entire family before Christmas.

I prayed them as a teenager, for the repose of the soul of parents of friends; I prayed them as a teacher with students to honor the school’s patroness, St. Rita of Cascia, on the days before her feast day; and just this year I prayed privately to Our Lady of Guadalupe in preparation for important meetings on U.S. Hispanic ministry. Novenas have been part of my life from its beginning and part of the life of the church since its very first centuries.


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