Sacraments shouldn't be the outward signs of a power trip

By Father Andrew Greeley| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments

Picture the lives of today's Catholics in contrast to the lives of our ancestors a hundred years ago, or of even the older generation who grew up during the Second World War. Unlike our parents, most of us attend college. We must choose among universities as distant as San Diego and Miami and among programs from women's studies to oceanography. Our possible marriage partners come from all over the country and indeed from all over the world. Divorce is a seriously considered option in many of our marriages.


Brokenness is in the Body of Christ

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Social Justice Spirituality

The church needs to open its doors to the broken bodies of Christ.

Of all the body parts I didn’t expect my busted knee to affect, it was my eyes. But I’m here to tell you that the first thing that changes when you’re hobbling around is what you see. Specifically, what I see are obstacles: stairs, curbs, uneven pavement, short drops—all of which, if not negotiated properly, result in exquisite little bursts of pain.


Brokenness is in the Body of Christ

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Social Justice Spirituality

The church needs to open its doors to the broken bodies of Christ.

Of all the body parts I didn’t expect my busted knee to affect, it was my eyes. But I’m here to tell you that the first thing that changes when you’re hobbling around is what you see. Specifically, what I see are obstacles: stairs, curbs, uneven pavement, short drops—all of which, if not negotiated properly, result in exquisite little bursts of pain.


Ordination, past and present: An interview with Gary Macy

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology Women
Our understanding of priests, bishops, and deacons has changed dramatically in the church's long history, says historian Gary Macy.

Words fail us: Priests respond to the new Missal a year later

By Scott Alessi| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
The new missal has made priests watch their language, but after one year most say the meaning of the Mass is getting lost in translation.

Words fail us: Parishioners respond to the new Missal a year later

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
Reporting straight from the pews after a year of the new translations, U.S. Catholic readers say they are still stumbling through the prayers.  

Stilted, awkward, unnatural, strange, choppy, clumsy, obtuse. If you read these words in a movie review, would you head for the ticket line or run in the opposite direction? What about wooden, tortured, terrible, ridiculous, inaccessible, or abominable? Are you at least intrigued by what could warrant such description? Would you want to check it out once a week?


What is the future of the liturgy?

By Father Anthony Ruff, O.S.B.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
Fifty years after the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the church faces new challenges. In this final installment of a three-part series, Father Anthony Ruff says the best way to defend the church’s liturgical renewal is to celebrate the reformed liturgy as well as possible.

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.


O come let us get ready

By Annemarie Scobey-Polacheck| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality Marriage and Family Prayer and Sacraments Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
In the pre-Christmas rush, take time for Advent. 

Jamie and Carol and their four children, ages 9 to 15, try to avoid looking at any Christmas decorations before Advent begins. It’s a playful practice with a deeper meaning.

“We love to shop, and our favorite store hangs up their Christmas decorations in September,” Carol says. “We actually turn our heads, hold up our hands to shield our eyes, and say, ‘Don’t look! It’s not even Advent yet.’ ”


Apology accepted

By Sheryl Frances Chen| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
Reconciliation is more than baring your soul to a confessor—it’s a place to remember that we’re always forgiven.

Catholics are less than two percent of the population of Norway, and there are only nine priests in our diocese. That means one does not have much choice of confessors. When I was at a meeting in Ireland, therefore, it occurred to me that I could ask one of the abbots there to hear my confession.


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