Don't be stingy with the sacraments

By Father Rosendo Urrabazo, C.M.F.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
Instead of greeting people with the third degree, the church should welcome them with open arms.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.

One day a woman came to our church office just wanting me to bless her 3-year-old son. Boy, did he put up a fight. The only offices he knew were medical offices, and he thought I was going to give him a shot. Unfortunately, that little boy is not the only Catholic intimidated to visit a church office.


I soap and pray: How doing the dishes can inspire prayer

By Ed Block| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality
Wash your own dishes and see the spiritual insights that bubble up.

The Eucharist and our obligation to the poor

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
The real bread of the Eucharist has plenty to say about people starving while others eat $17 burgers.

What Julian of Norwich can teach us about prayer

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Spirituality Women

After spending 20 years meditating on a number of visions, Julian of Norwich developed a deep understanding of God and produced her famous work, Revelations of Divine Love. Through her words, one can see the fruits of contemplative meditation.

While interviewing Father William Meninger on the topic of contemplative meditation for our November 2013 issue, we asked him what else we might learn from this 14th-century woman’s writings.


More Catholics share how they pray

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments

Prayer can be mysterious—in particular, other people’s prayer can be mysterious. In our November issue, we went ahead and asked six brave souls to reveal the benefits they reap and the struggles they have when they pray ("Private practices: The real prayer lives of Catholics," pages 12-17).

Here are a few additional Catholics who were willing to give us a glimpse into their day-to-day prayer lives:

 


Sit down and be quiet: How to practice contemplative meditation

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality
When you try to pray, do you fidget? Do you keep starting a grocery list in your head? Don’t worry. Just give God 20 minutes.

When Father William Meninger left his post in the Diocese of Yakima, Washington in 1963 to join the Trappists at St. Joseph Abbey in Spencer, Massachusetts, he told his mother, “That’s it, Mom. I’ll never be outside again.”


Private practices: The real prayer lives of Catholics

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality
Pray tell, when was the last time you actually talked to anyone about your prayer life? Six Catholics open up about how they talk—and listen—to God each day.

Don't look now: How to practice custody of the eyes

By Molly Jo Rose| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
Practicing custody of the eyes helps us stay focused on the important stuff.

The first time I heard the phrase “custody of the eyes,” I was not much older than 6 or 7. I was sitting beside my mom during Mass with her arm draped over my shoulder, one hand gripping me tightly. She was practicing that silent Catholic mom death grip—the one that says, “Be quiet and look straight ahead at the altar.” The task of looking directly ahead would have been easier if my dad weren’t fast asleep at the end of the pew.


35 years ago in U.S. Catholic: Bring back the rosary

Online Editor| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments War and Peace

By Father Daniel Berrigan, S.J.

This article appeared in the October 1978 issue of U.S. Catholic (Vol. 43, No. 10, pages 24-25).

Religious devotions are a little like lost-and­-found objects. Something gets lost, at least in the sense of losing sight of it. And then we come on it again, unexpectedly perhaps, lying there at our feet. It had been there all the time. But now it has about it a kind of glow, a patina. It is something like an old coin, the gospel says; we have every right to rejoice in finding it again.


Embracing Latino popular devotions

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Prayer and Sacraments Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Scripture and Theology
Theology professor Roberto Goizueta offers a crash course on the popular traditions of Latino Catholics.

As many American Catholics in parishes with growing Hispanic communities are learning, the church is filled with many different popular traditions and customs that enrich the faith lives of its members. But to those Catholics who may not know the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe or understand why someone would keep an altar in their home, these practices may seem a little unusual.


Pages