US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Learn your lines: How parishes are preparing for the new Mass

By Jeff Parrott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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It’s dress rehearsal time as parishes prepare for the new Mass.

It was last Advent season when Andy Hentz first heard his pastor talk about the new Latin-to-English translations coming to the Mass. But it wasn’t until Hentz, a mail carrier who reads Catholic magazines and listens to Catholic radio, read excerpts of the new texts on the Internet earlier this year that he realized how dramatic the changes will be.


To change or not to change: Responding to the new Mass

By Jeff Parrott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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American Catholics who still strongly dislike the new liturgical texts once they are implemented this Advent season will have three options:

1. Stop going to church.

2. Keep attending but stop participating fully in Mass.

3. Attend, participate, and learn to live with them.


Mass disruption: The new translations

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The new translation of the liturgy will speak volumes about the church that prays it.

November 28, 2010, the First Sunday of Advent, marks the beginning not only of a new liturgical year but a countdown to "welcoming the new Roman Missal," as the U.S. bishops' website calls its preparation program for the new translation of the Mass. Over the coming year English-speaking Catholics around the country will relearn prayers they have long been able to recite or sing by heart.


Let's bury the eulogy

By Father James Field| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.

A Catholic funeral Mass is no place for a eulogy, says a Catholic pastor, but that doesn’t mean we can’t speak well of the dead.

I was spending a leisurely minute planning my funeral the other day--not a savory task, but a prudent one since I have pancreatic cancer.


Liturgy: The good, the bad, and the ugly

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Bishop Donald Trautman shares what he likes and dislikes about how we do the liturgy in an October 2005 interview.

You've said we do a good job with liturgy in the United States. What are we doing well?

Participation of the people, for example, in singing, lecturing, serving as eucharistie ministers, altar servers, greeters. From the time people come in until the time they leave, I think we do liturgy very well.


Lost in translation: The new Missal

By Bishop Donald Trautman| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Why the new Mass prayers may be confusing.

I was leading a group discussion on the merits of the renewed liturgy of Vatican II when John, a middle-aged businessman, commented, “I can’t imagine my life without the liturgy; it strengthens me each week—but I never understood the Mass until we had it in English.”


Mixed messages: Liturgy across Christian churches

By Maxwell E. Johnson| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The new Catholic translations of the Mass pose a stumbling block to ecumenical relations, says a Lutheran liturgy scholar.

Incoming Missal

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Get ready for changes to your Sunday Mass.

Two rites make a wrong

By Ted Rosean| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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We are one church and we need just one Mass, this Catholic argues-even if that one Mass is celebrated in any number of languages.

Five ways to stay awake at Mass

By Kevin H. Axe| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The most important activity in the parish is Sunday Mass. Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles has written a lengthy pastoral letter on liturgical renewal to prepare the people of his archdiocese for the Jubilee Year 2000. He stresses in the letter that the Second Vatican Council held the renewal of the liturgy to be central to the life of the church, and the Sunday liturgy is, indeed, the "very center" of the church's life.


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