Accompanying the suffering

By Sue Stanton| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
As Ebola patients began to die in Africa last summer, it was not difficult for me to revisit the memory of my first AIDS patient. His death hurled me into an abyss, searching a dark corner of my own soul where, buried deep, lay the long held question of the value and meaning of human suffering. 
 

Experiencing grace in times of failure

By Kira Dault| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Culture Prayer and Sacraments
One day during my sophomore year of high school, I found myself crying in the hallway. I had just left my chemistry class and was heading down the hall to my locker. When I got there, I opened it, stuck my head inside, and let myself have a good sob before I went to my next class. I remember this moment with vivid detail, even down to what I was wearing (JNCO wide-leg jeans with my favorite black T-shirt). The reason? I had earned a C on the first chemistry exam of the year.
 

25 years ago in U.S. Catholic: Adult prayer, you can get there from here

Online Editor| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
Seven steps to simpler (and better) prayer.

By Michael Paul Gallagher

This essay appeared in the May 1990 issue of U.S. Catholic (Vol. 55, No. 5, pages11-13). Reprinted with permission from The Furrow, November 1988, Volume XXXIX, Number 11, pages 689-965.


Rite of passage

By Janet Shook| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
What began with giving a doll the sacrament of the sick ended up as a real-life lesson.

At the end of each school day, my first-grade students loved to play a game called “Dead Fish.” They’d all lie down on the rug, our imaginary pond, and play dead. If they moved, it was all over. They would be reeled in and proceed to get their backpacks and coats. The game was a fantastic way to settle down before dismissal. Many of the children ended up laughing or moving, but some won the game by staying motionless for 10 minutes.


Sinfully honest

By Kira Dault| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
U.S. Catholic readers confess that sin isn’t what it used to be, but they still commit themselves to a virtuous lifestyle.

Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Short story: Absolution

By Janet Cincotta| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments

When I entered the confessional that day I assumed I would be absolved of whatever transgressions I chose to reveal. From what I’ve been told, Father Charles has never been known to withhold his forgiveness and mercy. He understands the frailties of human virtue. He knows about the appetites of the flesh. In fact, I’ll wager he has surrendered to a few of them himself. So I expected to be forgiven. I did not, however, expect to be pitched into a full-blown midlife crisis as penance.


Should we hold hands during the Lord's prayer?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments
Holding hands (or not) is less important than praying in a “commonly bodily posture,” as the body of Christ.

Week Two: Lent provides a perfect opportunity for conversion

By Father Allan Figueroa Deck, S.J.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Social Justice

Students of Pope Francis summarize his agenda with the phrase “pastoral conversion.” Lent is an especially suitable time to think and pray about conversion. But what is pastoral conversion?


Week One: Three keys to making holiness a habit during Lent

By Joe Paprocki| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Spirituality

Lent is a time to rid ourselves of habits that are doing little good, or even causing harm, to ourselves and others, and to replace them with habits that are life-giving. Unfortunately, old habits die hard. And contrary to the popular notion that habits can be changed in 21 days, experts tell us that it can take up to a year to change old habits and develop new ones. Lent is 40 days for a reason—holiness is a habit, and habits take time to take hold.


It's time to separate church and state marriages

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Prayer and Sacraments
The church should focus on marriage as a sacrament and leave civil marriages to a local judge.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


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