US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Off the corporate ladder: Working for the church

By Leslie Scanlon | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Some professionals are quitting their day jobs and stepping up to a new spiritual calling.

if someone had told Barbara Evans a decade ago that she’d be working as the director of religious education for a parish in New Jersey, responsible for the faith formation of children and teenagers, she’d have told them they were crazy.


Degrees of service: More on lay ministry programs

By Leslie Scanlon | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
What types of lay ministry formation programs are available?

The answer varies—from shorter-term diocesan programs that might involve a class taken at night or on Saturdays for a month or two to formal university graduate school programs lasting several years.


Not in it for the money: Why some Catholics jump off the corporate ladder and into church ministry

By Leslie Scanlon | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Those who enter lay ecclesial formation programs do so for a variety of reasons, but not usually because they expect to find a job with a whopping paycheck at the end.

“Financially – if it were a pure financial decision, it would not make a lot of sense” to go to graduate school for such work, said Marti Jewell, an assistant professor of theology at the University of Dallas, who has studied the development of lay formation programs.


Bring remarried Catholics back to the table

By Father Paul M. Zulehner | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Editors’ note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Hold the applause: Save the praise for God alone

By Gregory F. Augustine Pierce | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.

We’re all part of the Body of Christ, so why are a select few soaking up all the attention at Mass?

At the end of the Christmas Eve Mass at my parish last year, the pastor said, “We’re going to have to sing one more song before we leave.” I looked at my wife, Kathy, and whispered, “Oh, no. They’re going to sing ‘Happy Birthday’ to Jesus.”


Parishes: Let's stop ignoring domestic violence

By Father Charles W. Dahm, O.P. | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Let's not make Mass about the ministers

By Gregory Pierce | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Please click HERE if not redirected in 5 seconds.


And lead us not into temper tantrums

By Heidi Schlumpf | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Lifestyle
It takes a parish to make a family—with rambunctious toddlers—feel welcome.

The angelic little tot, so cute in her Sunday best, is letting out some not-so-cute cries from the pew behind you. Do you: a) smile sweetly to yourself, realizing baby Jesus probably made a few peeps at temple, too? Or: b) silently curse the wailing little cherub for interfering with your comprehension of the first reading?


Father blogger

By Roxane B. Salonen | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith
In Pope Benedict XVI’s message for last year’s World Day of Communications, he summoned pastors to make the most of today’s technology to foster dialogue, increase evangelization, and prompt catechesis.

The parish that works: Business practices for the church

By Kristen Hannum | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Synergy, efficiency, and compliance aren’t just for business. They’re also important for a stronger church.

Pages