US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Identifying alcoholism in the workplace

By Father William Stenzel| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Lifestyle

Even if you don’t work in a parish, you might find yourself affected at work by your manager’s alcoholism or addiction. Just as family members are affected by a loved one’s addiction, so too are work colleagues.  

Many of us spend more time each day with people at work than with family members. We might even say that our colleagues are “like family.” When our employment dynamics mimic family dynamics, there’s a good chance that we will also develop similar behavioral characteristics.


When Father has a drinking problem

By Wendy Donahue| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Lifestyle
A priest’s alcoholism becomes the parish’s affliction, too.

Every week or so, Father Ray toted a suitcase past the rectory offices. “Dry cleaning,” he’d say.

“Liquor bottles,” feared both the pastor and Mary Catherine Meek, who worked in the suburban Chicago parish. People caught whiffs of alcohol on Father Ray (not his real name) at Mass. He had undergone treatment for alcoholism before this assignment.

Confronted by the pastor, Father Ray denied relapsing. The pastor expressed his concerns to the diocese.


All sworn out: Lay Catholics shouldn't have to sign loyalty oaths

By Rosemarie Zagarri| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Humbly support local churches

By Bishop Kevin Dowling| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith
With the church at a crossroads, Catholics look to Pope Francis for guidance. Bishop Kevin Dowling advises the pope to restore power to the people.

Readers share what they search for when choosing a parish

Online Editor| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith
More than 600 people took our April Reader Survey on shopping for a parish. Here's more of their feedback on what they look for when searching for a spiritual home.

The reason I stay at my current parish is…


What makes a parish worth sticking around?

By Elizabeth Lefebvre| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
When it comes to finding the perfect place of worship, U.S. Catholic readers say you’d better shop around.

Speaking from experience

By Karen Dix| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Latino Catholics: Caught between two worlds

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
It's past time for the U.S. Catholic Church to make Hispanic ministry, especially to second-generation Latinos, a priority in everything we do.

When Catholic parishes notice uncomfortable tensions between parishioners of different backgrounds, one of the people they call in as a “fixer” is University of Notre Dame theologian Timothy Matovina. Parishes that want to get better at dealing with their lack of unity, says this expert on Latino Catholicism, must move away from thinking they should provide a “welcome” to fellow Catholics of other ethnicities.


Back to the drawing board: Should churches be used for more than just Mass?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

The religious landscape is shifting. Don’t hunker down—get creative.


The Latino priest shortage and three ways to respond

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
The editors of U.S. Catholic interview Timothy Matovina, professor of theology and executive director of the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana.

[Read more from Timothy Matovina on Latino Catholics in the United States.] 


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