US Catholic Faith in Real Life

New Orleans’ long road to rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina

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The impact of Hurricane Katrina on the people and parishes of New Orleans was as varied as the diverse neighborhoods throughout the city they call home. For the mostly poor African American households at St. David Parish in the Lower Ninth Ward and even the solidly middle-class African American families at St. Gabriel the Archangel in the Gentilly neighborhood, rebuilding was a slow and steady process. But at St. Dominic Parish in Lakeview, most parishioners owned homes that were insured for a price that paid for rebuilding.


Better Know A Parish: The Catholic Community of Saints Peter and Paul, Hoboken, New Jersey

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Parish Name: The Catholic Community of Saints Peter and Paul

Location: Hoboken, New Jersey

Founded: 1889

Diocese: Archdiocese of Newark

Pastor: Msgr. Robert Meyer

Number of Parishioners: More than 1,000 families

Parish websitewww.spphoboken.com


Better Know A Parish: The Catholic Community of St. Odilia, Shoreview, Minnesota

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Parish Name: The Catholic Community of St. Odilia

Location: Shoreview, Minnesota

Founded: 1960

Diocese: Archdiocese of St. Paul/Minneapolis

Pastor: Father Phillip Rask

Number of Parishioners: 11,602 individuals in 3,150 registered households

Parish websitewww.stodilia.org


Better Know A Parish: The Catholic Community of Christ Our Light, Cherry Hill, New Jersey

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Parish Name: The Catholic Community of Christ Our Light

Location: Cherry Hill, New Jersey

Founded: 2009 as a result of a merger of St. Peter Celestine and Queen of Heaven (each founded in 1962)

Diocese: Camden

Pastor: Rev. Thomas Newton

Number of Parishioners: More than 3,500 families

Parish websitewww.christourlight.net


30 years ago in U.S. Catholic: Does anyone give a damn about teenage Catholics?

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By Dan Morris

This article appeared in the January 1985 issue of U.S. Catholic (Vol. 50, No. 1, pages 26-31).


Better Know A Parish: Saint Hyacinth Church, Detroit, Michigan

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Parish Name: Saint Hyacinth Catholic Church

Location: Detroit, Michigan

Founded: 1907

Diocese: Archdiocese of Detroit

Pastor: Reverend Father Janusz Iwan

Number of Parishioners: 300

Parish websitewww.sainthyacinth.com


Better Know A Parish: Immaculate Conception Parish, Malden, Massachusetts

Caitlyn Schmid | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Parish Name: Immaculate Conception

Location: Malden, Massachusetts

Founded: 1854

Diocese: Boston

Pastor: Father Richard Mehm

Number of Parishioners: More than 1,600 families

Parish websitewww.icmalden.com


Inside America's most beautiful churches

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From the mountains to the prairies, Catholic churches stand tall—as widely varied as the people who worship in them.

Better Know A Parish: Corpus Christi University Parish, Toledo, Ohio

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Parish Name: Corpus Christi University Parish

Location: Toledo, Ohio

Founded: 1970

Diocese: Toledo

Pastor: Msgr. Michael Billian

Number of Parishioners: We are a university parish, so our parish census is always changing. We average around 1,000 people at Masses on weekends.

Parish websitewww.ccup.org


The next generation of lay ministers

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As the first wave of lay parish staff members begins to retire, a fresh crop of young people are bringing new energy and new ideas to parishes across the country.

Not every teenager knows what they want to do for a living, and fewer still dream of a career in church ministry. But after getting involved in her parish’s youth ministry program during her teenage years, Emily Anderson knew that this was what she wanted to do with her life.


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