It's fun to be Catholic

By Father Andrew Greeley| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality

In its best moments Catholicism is the happiest of the major world religions. It is permeated by the reverent joy of Christmas night, the exultant joy of Easter morn, the gentle joy of First Communion, the satisfied joy of grammar school graduation, the hopeful joy of a funeral Mass, the confident joy of a May crowning. Catholicism is shaped by the happiness of hymns like "O Come, O Come, Emmanuel," "Adeste Fideles," the "Exultet," and "Bring Flowers of the Fairest."

 


Parishes with Pull

By Paul Wilkes| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

There are certainly many new approaches to spirituality and belief these days, but the parish remains the place most Catholics go to for sustenance. In fact, two thirds of all American Catholics are registered parishioners. While a varied lot, to be sure, they all are looking for-albeit in many different ways-a transcendent connection to God and guidance for their life's journey, a place where they will be at once nurtured and prodded. Catholics today seek not just to be on the rolls of an institution to fulfill their religious obligations; they want a spiritual home.

 


Parishes with Pull

By Paul Wilkes| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

There are certainly many new approaches to spirituality and belief these days, but the parish remains the place most Catholics go to for sustenance. In fact, two thirds of all American Catholics are registered parishioners. While a varied lot, to be sure, they all are looking for-albeit in many different ways-a transcendent connection to God and guidance for their life's journey, a place where they will be at once nurtured and prodded. Catholics today seek not just to be on the rolls of an institution to fulfill their religious obligations; they want a spiritual home.

 


The rite way to welcome new Catholics

By Tim Unsworth| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments

The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) is conceptually akin to the building of a church. Further, it reminds one of the miracle of the loaves and fishes.

Fueled largely by the personal experiences of faith of all involved, it multiplies graces and fills baskets with the leftovers of the experience of what it really means to be Catholic.


Let’s tailor the seamless garment

By Mary Meehan| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Sex and Sexuality War and Peace
We have stretched out the consistent ethic of life on both sides of the political debate, an activist argues. Trimming out all but the key issues would set our priorities straight.

 

We were a hopeful band of prolife peaceniks, venturing out one summer day in 1979 to dialogue with other folks on the left. They were demonstrating in Cincinnati against a National Right to Life Convention. We passed leaflets out to them and carried picket signs with messages such as "Anti-War=Prolife/Be Consistent!"


Pardon our dust

By Bryan Froehle| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Scripture and Theology
We live in a messy time of transition in the Catholic Church. Sociologist Bryan T. Froehle offers four tools to help us through the renovation.

Battle fatigue

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Vatican
Five years into the sex abuse crisis, some Catholics are growing weary, while others are cautiously optimistic.

 


Here comes everybody else

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Parish Life
Our color in the Crayola box of "flesh tones" shouldn't determine our place in the church.

Corporate reorganizations have become so common that they hardly merit mention, even when the corporation in question is the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). The USCCB has been under steady pressure to reduce costs and has just completed a process of "streamlining." As anyone who's been reorganized or streamlined well knows, that means cutting staff and departments.


Ni aquí nor there

By Agustin Gurza| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Immigration Parish Life
They're not immigrants, but they don't feel fully "American" either: U.S.-born Latinos are struggling to find their place in the U.S. Catholic Church.

That all may be one

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Parish Life Scripture and Theology
As a novice, María Elena González wanted to be a "kitchen sister," just like the sister she admired. That was not, however, what was in store for her. Still, she wanted to be with the people, to work in a parish. She did work in Guatemala for a while. Later, she was happy serving the people of Lubbock, Texas as diocesan chancellor when she was called to have a still larger impact: to become the first woman president of the Mexican American Cultural Center in San Antonio.

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