How to help parishioners with the baby blues

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life

Mother's day is hard. Baptisms are really hard. Christmas, with all its talk of the birth of baby Jesus, isn't exactly a happy occasion either. Church should be a source of consolation during trying times, but for couples suffering from infertility, it's often an alienating, difficult place. And, although one in six couples now has difficulty conceiving or has experienced miscarriage, few parishes offer any services or even acknowledge the pain of infertility.


What I learned from Father Dan

By Margaret Brennan| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality
Many gay priests have served and continue to serve our church well. Let's not make them scapegoats for the sins of others.

 

IN OUR CHURCH AND IN THE MEDIA THERE HAS BEEN MUCH TALK about the recently released Vatican instruction on vocation discernment and gay seminarians. As a middle-aged, married woman and the mother of two teenage children who has worked for most of her professional life in ministry, why should I care to add to that debate? Shouldn't I just leave the commenting to a gay priest or seminarian?


For crying out loud, let's keep kids from disrupting Mass

By Joel Schorn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life

It happened again last Sunday, as it has happened other Sundays. A young couple arrives-usually late-with an infant and toddler in tow. After making a commotion in the back of the church, taking off coats, extracting the toddler from his buggy, and assembling an array of child-care accessories, they walk to a seat in front of the church-almost as in solemn procession-during one of the readings, thereby becoming the center of attention. For the duration of the Mass, the baby fusses, and the older child, unattended, runs back and forth up and down the aisle.


For crying out loud, let's keep kids from disrupting Mass

By Joel Schorn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life

It happened again last Sunday, as it has happened other Sundays. A young couple arrives-usually late-with an infant and toddler in tow. After making a commotion in the back of the church, taking off coats, extracting the toddler from his buggy, and assembling an array of child-care accessories, they walk to a seat in front of the church-almost as in solemn procession-during one of the readings, thereby becoming the center of attention. For the duration of the Mass, the baby fusses, and the older child, unattended, runs back and forth up and down the aisle.


Wherever two or three thousand are gathered

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

The 1,200 people who packed Olivet Baptist Church on Chicago's South Side on a chilly Monday evening last December were assured by the event's organizers that the meeting would begin on the dot at 7:30 and last one hour and 15 minutes. They delivered on both counts. This was but one in a series of assemblies sponsored by United Power for Action and Justice, a massive citizens' organization created in 1997. The gathering-a racial rainbow from city and suburbs-included white collar, blue collar, and no collar.


Wherever two or three thousand are gathered

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

The 1,200 people who packed Olivet Baptist Church on Chicago's South Side on a chilly Monday evening last December were assured by the event's organizers that the meeting would begin on the dot at 7:30 and last one hour and 15 minutes. They delivered on both counts. This was but one in a series of assemblies sponsored by United Power for Action and Justice, a massive citizens' organization created in 1997. The gathering-a racial rainbow from city and suburbs-included white collar, blue collar, and no collar.


Who moved my tabernacle? The ruckus over renovation

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

There are many issues about which Catholics disagree these days-birth control, divorce and remarriage, sex education in schools, the ordination of women, the rights of homosexuals, the silencing of theologians, to name a few. Yet all these hot buttons cool to relative insignificance compared with one issue capable of generating white hot incandescence among the faithful: church renovation!


Who moved my tabernacle? The ruckus over renovation

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

There are many issues about which Catholics disagree these days-birth control, divorce and remarriage, sex education in schools, the ordination of women, the rights of homosexuals, the silencing of theologians, to name a few. Yet all these hot buttons cool to relative insignificance compared with one issue capable of generating white hot incandescence among the faithful: church renovation!


Does it pay to work for the church?

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Laypeople who make a living in the church love what they do--but don't always love the pay.

 


Does it pay to work for the church?

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Laypeople who make a living in the church love what they do--but don't always love the pay.

 


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