Foreign ministry

By Jeff Parrott| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
The shortage of priests has made some places in the United States “mission territory,” drawing clergy the world over to a parish near you.

One would expect to be nervous in his situation, but his warm, frequent smiles make him seem at ease this evening.


When bad things happen to good parishes

By Father Paul Boudreau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Parishes can’t always anticipate impending disaster, but there’s plenty they can do to prepare and protect themselves from the worst.

When bad things happen to good parishes

By Father Paul Boudreau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Parishes can’t always anticipate impending disaster, but there’s plenty they can do to prepare and protect themselves from the worst.

Let's get political

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics
How parishes can successfully navigate this election year and promote faithful citizenship

Recovering Catholics

By Vincent Gragnani| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Spirituality Young Adults
We can learn a lot from people who left the church, whether we can win them back or not.

For generations, the Baltimore Catechism taught that Catholics who miss Sunday Mass through their own fault commit a mortal sin, making the soul an enemy of God, depriving it of the right to everlasting happiness in heaven, and making it fit for everlasting punishment in hell.


5 ways to take the dread out of religious ed

By Bill Huebsch| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

It was a typical Wednesday evening at the Parish Church. Gloria Jackson was preparing to meet her sixth-grade class for religious ed. This was the third class session in Gloria's short career as a volunteer catechist. Hers was a large, suburban parish and, because there were so many volunteer catechists, only those with problems received attention from the parish staff. Gloria was pretty much on her own with the sixth grade.


5 ways to take the dread out of religious ed

By Bill Huebsch| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

It was a typical Wednesday evening at the Parish Church. Gloria Jackson was preparing to meet her sixth-grade class for religious ed. This was the third class session in Gloria's short career as a volunteer catechist. Hers was a large, suburban parish and, because there were so many volunteer catechists, only those with problems received attention from the parish staff. Gloria was pretty much on her own with the sixth grade.


Big gifts come in small prayer groups

By María Ruiz Scaperlanda| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments

With a wink and a smile and a sueeze of the hand. Gilda Rodriguez naturally knows what question to ask, what personal thing to say to each person she greets. That's no small task in a group of 50 or so Spanish-speaking parishioners gathered at St. Cyril of Alexandria Parish in Tucson, Arizona. As they do every Thursday for two hours, the men, women, and even teenagers come together to pray, sing, and share the Word of God with each other.


Big gifts come in small prayer groups

By María Ruiz Scaperlanda| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments

With a wink and a smile and a sueeze of the hand. Gilda Rodriguez naturally knows what question to ask, what personal thing to say to each person she greets. That's no small task in a group of 50 or so Spanish-speaking parishioners gathered at St. Cyril of Alexandria Parish in Tucson, Arizona. As they do every Thursday for two hours, the men, women, and even teenagers come together to pray, sing, and share the Word of God with each other.


Can the church get in step with stepfamilies?

By Donna Hornik| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life

Bette Hausman and Don Storck are in love and want to spend the rest of their lives together. If only it were as easy as scheduling the priest and ordering the cake for the Happily Ever After to begin. Storck prefers to complete his conversion to Catholicism first. The Pennsylvania couple must also wait for Storck's annulment to finalize. While they care for spiritual matters, Hausman's children make room for Storck inside their home.


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