Watch your steps

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Mass could use the hard dose of reality offered by those recovering from addiction. 

I go to church every Sunday with a bunch of addicts.

Well, technically, I've been going to church alongside the addicts. For the past 10 years a Narcotics Anonymous group has been meeting in the church basement during our Sunday evening liturgy. They're also not really "addicts" but in recovery-though the unflinching honesty of their gathering leads me to believe that they wouldn't shy away from such a politically incorrect term.


Watch your steps

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Mass could use the hard dose of reality offered by those recovering from addiction.

I go to church every Sunday with a bunch of addicts.

Well, technically, I’ve been going to church alongside the addicts. For the past 10 years a Narcotics Anonymous group has been meeting in the church basement during our Sunday evening liturgy. They’re also not really “addicts” but in recovery—though the unflinching honesty of their gathering leads me to believe that they wouldn’t shy away from such a politically incorrect term.


Parish counciling

By Gregory F. Augustine Pierce| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Lord knows these organizations need some help serving their communities.

OK, children, gather around. I'll tell you what life was like before parish councils, back when my hair was brown and my dreams were green.

The pastor pretty much ran things, and that was fine with most of us. First of all, we didn't have to go to a lot of boring meetings. Second, we were free to complain to one another (and sometimes to him) about what was wrong with the parish without feeling one iota of guilt or responsibility. Finally, we didn't have to go to a lot of boring meetings.


Parish counciling

By Gregory F. Augustine Pierce| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Lord knows these organizations need some help serving their communities.

OK, children, gather around. I'll tell you what life was like before parish councils, back when my hair was brown and my dreams were green.

The pastor pretty much ran things, and that was fine with most of us. First of all, we didn't have to go to a lot of boring meetings. Second, we were free to complain to one another (and sometimes to him) about what was wrong with the parish without feeling one iota of guilt or responsibility. Finally, we didn't have to go to a lot of boring meetings.


Parish counciling

By Gregory F. Augustine Pierce| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life
Lord knows these organizations need some help serving their communities.

OK, children, gather around. I'll tell you what life was like before parish councils, back when my hair was brown and my dreams were green.

The pastor pretty much ran things, and that was fine with most of us. First of all, we didn't have to go to a lot of boring meetings. Second, we were free to complain to one another (and sometimes to him) about what was wrong with the parish without feeling one iota of guilt or responsibility. Finally, we didn't have to go to a lot of boring meetings.


Make room in the pew, and smile

By Darcee Thomason| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life

We were nervous walking into the new parish for the first time. My husband and I settled our three children into a pew near the rear for a quick escape if we needed. We brought a backpack of small toys and favorite books. Most of our concern stemmed from our then-6-year-old daughter, Rachel, who is severely autistic. Would she behave? Would she have a meltdown? Would the other parishioners accept our family, or would we see icy stares, hear the under-the-breath comments, be subjected to the unsolicited advice we had experienced elsewhere?


Make room in the pew, and smile

By Darcee Thomason| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life

We were nervous walking into the new parish for the first time. My husband and I settled our three children into a pew near the rear for a quick escape if we needed. We brought a backpack of small toys and favorite books. Most of our concern stemmed from our then-6-year-old daughter, Rachel, who is severely autistic. Would she behave? Would she have a meltdown? Would the other parishioners accept our family, or would we see icy stares, hear the under-the-breath comments, be subjected to the unsolicited advice we had experienced elsewhere?


Make room in the pew, and smile

By Darcee Thomason| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life

We were nervous walking into the new parish for the first time. My husband and I settled our three children into a pew near the rear for a quick escape if we needed. We brought a backpack of small toys and favorite books. Most of our concern stemmed from our then-6-year-old daughter, Rachel, who is severely autistic. Would she behave? Would she have a meltdown? Would the other parishioners accept our family, or would we see icy stares, hear the under-the-breath comments, be subjected to the unsolicited advice we had experienced elsewhere?


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