Hold the applause: Save the praise for God alone

By Gregory F. Augustine Pierce| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.

We’re all part of the Body of Christ, so why are a select few soaking up all the attention at Mass?

At the end of the Christmas Eve Mass at my parish last year, the pastor said, “We’re going to have to sing one more song before we leave.” I looked at my wife, Kathy, and whispered, “Oh, no. They’re going to sing ‘Happy Birthday’ to Jesus.”


Hold the applause: Save the praise for God alone

By Gregory F. Augustine Pierce| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.

We’re all part of the Body of Christ, so why are a select few soaking up all the attention at Mass?

At the end of the Christmas Eve Mass at my parish last year, the pastor said, “We’re going to have to sing one more song before we leave.” I looked at my wife, Kathy, and whispered, “Oh, no. They’re going to sing ‘Happy Birthday’ to Jesus.”


Poorly worded: Can we have a Mass that speaks to real people?

By Father William J. O’Malley, S.J.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
The translators of the new Mass prayers have neglected one cardinal rule: Consider your audience.

As the days dwindled before their triumphal entry, the new liturgical changes had not yet risen to even an underwhelming response. “One in being” in the creed pretty much satisfied the mass of still-loyal Catholics, since they neither understood what it meant nor cared enough to Google it. And its replacement, “consubstantial,” is hollower and even less intriguing. Parishioners’ only real problem is why such stuff even matters.


Where did the new Mass translations come from?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology
How did we arrive at this translation of the Mass?

As Catholics in the United States get accustomed to new responses and prayers at Sunday Mass, many will probably ask: Why did the Mass change? The answers have to do with changes to the Latin text upon which the English translation is based and on the rules according to which the translations are made.


Parishes: Let's stop ignoring domestic violence

By Father Charles W. Dahm, O.P.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Women

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Parishes: Let's stop ignoring domestic violence

By Father Charles W. Dahm, O.P.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Women

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


What's an extraordinary minister of communion?

By Joseph Walsh| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life

 "Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion" is the formal title of laypeople who distribute the Eucharist during Mass. As the title implies, there are also "ordinary ministers" - those who are literally "ordained" to the ministry namely bishops, priests, and deacons. These ministers are usually the first in order to distribute the Body and Blood of Christ, the deacon being the customary distributor of the cup.


Feeding the hunger: The spirituality of being a communion minister

By Joseph Walsh| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
Offering Christ's Body and Blood to fellow parishioners helps this Catholic find a fuller Communion.

"The eyes have it!" Spelled a bit differently, this phrase is a standard for reporting a positive outcome of a debate. In the act of distributing the Holy Eucharist, it means something different: that there has been a human connection as the true presence of Jesus is being celebrated and distributed.


Let's not make Mass about the ministers

By Gregory Pierce| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

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Parish resources for growing a community garden

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Parish Life Social Justice
Practical, hands-on actions are the best way for individuals and faith communities to put their faith into action, says the Michigan Catholic Rural Life Coalition (MCLRC). Here’s how they say to get involved and get growing.
 

Parish Farmer’s Market:


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