US Catholic Faith in Real Life

A vision of things to come

By Godfrey Diekmann | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Living in daily expectation of "seeing God,"Father Godfrey Diekmann, O.S.B. shares his thoughts about heaven, beauty, and deification.


Church Ladies

By Renée M. LaReau | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Scratching the stained-glass ceiling, an increasing number of women hold leadership positions in the church. A look at the gifts they bring and the challenges they face.

Unexcusable absence: How Catholic schools reach Hispanic students

By Jeff Parrott | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Catholic schools have largely failed to attract Hispanic Catholics, but some parishes have found innovative ways to draw them in.

As her Puerto Rican immigrant mother had done with her as a child growing up in Chicago, Jennifer Bonesz sent both of her daughters to Catholic schools. Athena, 14, attended from preschool through eighth grade, and Damary, 8, from preschool through third grade.


Philanthropy helps to fill seats at Catholic schools

By Jeff Parrott | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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At the urban Dallas public school she had attended since kindergarten, Karen Hernandez’ grades were mediocre. By the end of fifth grade, her parents didn’t like the direction she seemed to be heading as the precarious adolescent years neared. “She was a follower, and she was starting to hang out with the wrong crowd,” recalls her mother, Belinda Hernandez.


Value added? Catholic professional schools

By Leslie Scanlon | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The jury’s out on whether Catholic law and business schools give students a higher degree of faith.

When Brian Chan was applying to graduate business schools in 2002, finding a Catholic university was not on his wish list at all.

“I applied to the programs that had the biggest names—Harvard, Stanford, Wharton,” Chan says. “I didn’t consider whether they were Catholic or not. I went for the higher rankings.”


Change we can believe in: The pope, condoms, and church teaching

By Bryan Cones | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Church teaching is the same always and everywhere—except when it isn’t.

Using the words “pope” and “condom” in the same sentence is bound to draw attention; when it’s the pope himself using the latter word in a sentence of his own, the world takes notice.


Femme fidele: How women who work for the church keep the faith

By Heidi Schlumpf | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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How women who work for the church keep the faith

It’s lunchtime at St. Clement Parish in Chicago, and although some of the city’s best restaurants are within walking distance, most of the staff members instead opt for microwaved leftovers and conversation with colleagues around the conference table. The building engineer and associate pastor stop by for a quick bite, but otherwise this makeshift lunchroom is Estrogen Central.

A large parish of 4,000 mostly middle- and upper-class families, St. Clement boasts 12 full-time, well-educated lay employees. Only two are men.


Church ladies: Women in leadership

By Renée M. LaReau | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Scratching the stained-glass ceiling, an increasing number of women hold leadership positions in the church. Here's a look at the gifts they bring and the challenges they face.

America the anxious

By Bryan Cones | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Only our better angels can guide us to interreligious understanding.

American politics always seems to turn on the next "threat" to our security, especially in an election year. Warnings about hordes of brown-skinned Spanish-speaking "illegals" had kept the nation on high alert through most of 2010, but as elections drew near and pundits and politicians saw demonizing immigrants as a loser among Hispanic voters, the search was on for a new bogeyman.


Will the center hold?

By Bryan Cones | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The church as we know it won’t last if its broad middle begins to shrink.

Pop culture journalists had the brass ring of celebrity stories dropped on them in August when author Anne Rice, grande dame of the current vampire entertainment empire, announced that, 10 years after her return to the Roman Catholic faith of her childhood, she was leaving once again.


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