The mamas and the papas: What it's like for Catholic parents of GLBT children

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality
Parents have much to say about the church and their children.

The young priest preached on the sanctity of life at a Denver hospice. Afterward an older couple asked him if their son, who had died of AIDS, would be in hell forever. The priest said he couldn’t answer that.

More than 20 years later Shawn Reynolds still remembers the anguish on the couple’s faces. “He didn’t say anything about Christ’s love,” Reynolds says.


Built of living stones

By Cyprian Davis| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality

The history of African American Catholicism began with the arrival of the Spanish settlers in the 16th century in Florida. In fact, on the first page of the 16th-century baptismal registers are the names of black infants who were baptized into the Body of Christ along with white infants in St. Augustine Church.


Dancing with the stars: An interview with astronomer George Coyne, S.J.

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Faith and Science Scripture and Theology
With 10,000 billion billion heavenly bodies in the cosmic ballroom, God has created a grand universe of possibilities.

As a priest and an astronomer, Jesuit Father George Coyne bridges the worlds of faith and science, but he’s quick to acknowledge that they serve two different purposes. “I can’t know if there is a God or if there is not a God by science,” he says.


Bring remarried Catholics back to the table

By Father Paul M. Zulehner| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Scripture and Theology

Editors’ note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


A woman on the altar: Can the church ordain women deacons?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Vatican Women
The issue of women priests may be a settled matter, but that doesn’t mean a woman can’t serve the church as a deacon.

Poorly worded: Can we have a Mass that speaks to real people?

By Father William J. O’Malley, S.J.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments
The translators of the new Mass prayers have neglected one cardinal rule: Consider your audience.

As the days dwindled before their triumphal entry, the new liturgical changes had not yet risen to even an underwhelming response. “One in being” in the creed pretty much satisfied the mass of still-loyal Catholics, since they neither understood what it meant nor cared enough to Google it. And its replacement, “consubstantial,” is hollower and even less intriguing. Parishioners’ only real problem is why such stuff even matters.


Web Only: More from Phyllis Zagano on women deacons

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Vatican Women

With so many lay ecclesial ministers and directors of religious education out there, many of whom are women, why would a bishop “need” a woman as a deacon?

If I were a bishop, I would want a cadre of people I have trained and ordained, and to whom I have given faculties. The ordained women deacons would be catechists and would prepare people for sacraments. After they have prepared women and men to marry or to be received in the church, these deacons could actually perform the ceremony.


Has hell frozen over?

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
Church teaching has shifted away from damnation and now focuses on salvation. Is that a good thing?

To a young girl attending Catholic school in the 1940s, eternal damnation was no abstract concept. “The nuns really terrified us,” says Pat Conroy, who grew up in Maryland. The list of potential transgressions—from eating meat on Fridays to missing Mass on Sundays—was long. “It seemed like almost anything was enough to send you to hell. I became so scrupulous and worried about everything I did.”


You’re cut off: No more cup for the people?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments

UPDATE: Since this article was published, the diocese of Phoenix has overturned its initial decision about eliminating communion from the cup. Read this USCatholic.org blog post for more information.


Parishes: Let's stop ignoring domestic violence

By Father Charles W. Dahm, O.P.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Women

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


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