Signs of peace

By Gerard F. Powers| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Catholics around the world can inspire us with the many ways — both personal and political — through which they build peace.

Mary Mukanaho is a Tutsi in Rwanda. Her seven children and husband were killed in the 1994 genocide-by neighbors whom she had lived next to for 40 years. She survived because she happened to be out of the country at the time. She felt she was going mad and turned to alcohol to dull the pain. She was enraged to see her neighbors receive Communion with the very hands that had murdered her family.


Let's really go in peace

By John Dear| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
We need to break our personal and national addiction to violence if we hope to ever see an end to war.

To our modern ears the idea of heresy seems quaint and medieval-involving technical arguments about abstract matters. But I contend that heresy and its cousin apostasy are constructs of down-to-earth significance that we should keep in mind today. And for us Catholics, I submit, our chief heresy is violence.


Commencement duress

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics
Catholics shouldn't let single-issue politics deprive us of our hard-won place at the heart of America's democracy.

Ah, spring. A warming sun melts the winter freeze, while the proverbial April showers give way to May's commencement speaker "scandal" at the local Catholic college, splashed across the morning news.


The unimportance of being earnest

By Father Paul Boudreau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
Catholics need to lighten up and see the bright side of sometimes being the butt of jokes. It wouldn’t hurt to laugh at ourselves once in a while—it might even lift our spirits.

The unimportance of being earnest

By Father Paul Boudreau| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
Catholics need to lighten up and see the bright side of sometimes being the butt of jokes. It wouldn’t hurt to laugh at ourselves once in a while—it might even lift our spirits.

Who are the Lefebvrites, and are they Catholic?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology

The Society of St. Pius X (SSPX), whose members are commonly known as “Lefebvrites” after their founder, Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, is a group of about 150,000 former Roman Catholics who disagree with elements of the Second Vatican Council, beginning with its reform of the liturgy.


Sep 1983 cover of Salt magazine

Let's canonize Dorothy Day

By Father Henry Fehren| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Social Justice War and Peace
With this 1983 article Claretian Publications began a grassroots effort to promote the official declaration of Dorothy Day as a saint.

Kenya rising: The Catholic Church in Africa

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
The growing Kenyan church responds to the challenges of a young democracy.

“Our mother, Kenya, we love you so much; we need you again,” sing the students at St. Joseph Freinademetz Primary School in Ruai, outside of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya.

In early 2008 Kenya abandoned her children. When violence broke out following the contested December 27, 2007 election, about 1,150 people were killed and 300,000 displaced. For three months students weren’t in school. Homes, farms, and businesses were burned to the ground, and the economy ground to a halt.


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