Bring back men in black

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Article Parish Life
Religious clothing allows Catholics to make a fashion statement about their faith, says a young priest who sports the look that a previous generation put away.

Don't forget the flowers

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Article Spirituality
Bad news about the church can be a good opportunity to remember why we’re here in the first place.

With some reluctance I have to admit that one reason I am a Catholic today is a May crowning—actually a series of them. The first Friday of every May at St. Joseph School featured a riot of flowers gathered by every student, lovingly (if not artfully) arranged around our standard blue statue of Mary, which would be crowned twice, by a lucky boy and girl respectively.


Certifiably Catholic

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Article Scripture and Theology
Our place in the church isn't determined by politics or policy.

If there's one lesson Americans can take from the last 12 months of our political life, it's that something called "bipartisanship" is long dead and buried. If the recent national debate on health care is an indication, anyone "reaching across the aisle" is most likely trying to punch the person in the opposite chair.


A tale of two visitations: Biblical and apostolic

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Article Scripture and Theology Women
The apostolic visitation of women religious should reflect the Biblical visitation between Mary and Elizabeth.

The word visitation has a rich biblical heritage. Familiar to most Christians as the time when Mary and Elizabeth meet, greet, and talk to one another before the births of their sons, this biblical Visitation throbs with the energy of women's voices pregnant with life and hope.


Under the watchful eye: LCWR investigated

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Article Vatican Women
Just weeks after the visitation of American women religious congregations was announced, the Leadership Conference of Women's Religious (LCWR) learned that it would be the subject of a doctrinal assessment by the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF).

The 44-year-old LCWR has 1,500 members who represent about 95 percent of U.S. women religious. It is a resource to the leaders of congregations and it also provides a collective voice on issues of justice.


Character witnesses: Readers defend the sisters

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Article Vatican Women

The Sisters of Mercy aren't McDonald's

By Sandra Schneiders| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Vatican Women
Religious congregations are not franchises of the Vatican "central office." More like families than corporations, sisters have different missions, needs, and styles of life.

When the Vatican investigation of U.S. women religious is discussed, two questions are asked repeatedly:

1) If religious have nothing to hide, why would they object to being investigated by the Vatican?


No forgiveness, no future: An interview with Archbishop Desmund Tutu

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Article Scripture and Theology War and Peace
In an interview from our archives (August 2000), Archbishop Desmond Tutu shares the lessons learned from chairing South Africa's Turth and Reconciliation Commission.

Use your inside voice: Why media shouting is bad for the pro-life cause

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Article Ethic of Life Politics
The high pitch of pro-life advocacy could heed some old-fashioned parental guidance.

Voices from the debate: The church on end-of-life care

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life
While Catholic moral teaching on medical treatment has been in place for hundreds of years, the last three decades have seen increased development and debate.

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