US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Let's canonize Dorothy Day

Dorothy Day, canonization, saint, Salt magazine, Claretians, Henry Fehren

By Father Henry Fehren | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
With this 1983 article Claretian Publications began a grassroots effort to promote the official declaration of Dorothy Day as a saint.

Kenya rising: The Catholic Church in Africa

By Megan Sweas | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
The growing Kenyan church responds to the challenges of a young democracy.

“Our mother, Kenya, we love you so much; we need you again,” sing the students at St. Joseph Freinademetz Primary School in Ruai, outside of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya.

In early 2008 Kenya abandoned her children. When violence broke out following the contested December 27, 2007 election, about 1,150 people were killed and 300,000 displaced. For three months students weren’t in school. Homes, farms, and businesses were burned to the ground, and the economy ground to a halt.


And God created Darwin

By A U.S. Catholic interview | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Evolution isn’t just for scientists, argues this professor of theology. People of faith must selectively adapt to Darwin as well.

When Charles Darwin was born 200 years ago this month, no one could have guessed the impact his Origin of Species (1859) would have not only on science but on religion as well.


Fault lines

By J.D. Long-García | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
The immigration debate comes home to Catholic parishes

She brought her children here from her country because she feared gangs would kill them.

“I left because of the delinquency of El Salvador. The situation there is very delicate. A mother has instincts toward her children, and, well, I saw a very dangerous future for them,” Maria Ayala says.

The Salvadoran civil war—which killed some 70,000 from 1980 to 1992, including San Salvador Archbishop Oscar Romero—spawned gang violence by groups like Mara Salvatrucha.


Proceed with caution

By Bryan Cones | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Now is not the time to rush World War II's pope to a place among the beatified.

"But why now?" came the bewildered question from my fellow journalist, the editor of a Chicago Jewish newspaper. His query came at the end of a radio discussion about Pope Pius XII, the World War II-era pope whom many accuse of silence in the face of the genocide of Europe's Jews. Since I was the only non-Jew among the four journalists in the studio, I think I can be forgiven for feeling the weight of 40 years of improved Jewish-Catholic relations riding on my answer.


The Prophet’s daughters

By A U.S. Catholic interview | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
There’s much in Islam that favors women, says this scholar. As sisters in faith Muslim and Catholic women can seek out such traditions together.

Syafa Almirzanah, a professor of comparative religion at Islamic University Sunan Kalijaga in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, could have continued her studies anywhere in the Muslim world, but she chose Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. Last spring she became the first Muslim to earn a doctorate from the school.


Postively pro-life

By Bryan Cones | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Catholics must focus on the battle for hearts and minds to be successful in the effort to end abortion.

The United States will make history this month, inaugurating its first African-American president on January 20, a day that nearly coincides with another momentous event 36 years ago: the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that found a right to abortion in the U.S. Constitution.


Morality check

By Bryan Cones | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
The global fight against HIV and AIDS requires all the means at our disposal.

Thirty-three million. Twenty-five million. Eleven million. These numbers are worth contemplating as we commemorate World AIDS Day on December 1. The first is the World Health Organization’s estimate of those infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), which causes Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The second is the number of those who have died of AIDS since 1981. The last figure counts the children orphaned by the disease—in Africa alone.


Catholic and feminist: You got a problem with that?

By Megan Sweas | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Catholics ought to be loud and proud in the fight for women’s rights, argues a young feminist.

Pages