US Catholic Faith in Real Life

In response to the <a href="http://www.uscatholic.org/january2011>January 2011 special issue on women</a>, <em>U.S. Catholic</em> has invited our writers, scholars, and readers to contribute their thoughts on how they keep the faith as women in the church. Check back throughout January to read how both prominent and ordinary women answer this question. You may also share your own reflections by submitting a guest blog post (about 500 words) to <a href="mailto:onlineeditor@uscatholic.org">onlineeditor@uscatholic.org</a>.

Dorothy Day—the disturbing “holy fool”

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By guest blogger Kevin Considine

It is not easy to write about Dorothy Day.  Gallons of ink have been spilled discussing her life and legacy.  At this point, describing her as an inspirational Catholic woman has almost become trite.  Hasn’t enough already been written?  What about other women, such as Dolores Huerta, Kateri Tekakwitha, Sor Juana de la Cruz, St. Katherine Drexel, and many others?  That’s not to mention the countless unsung heroines who work tirelessly to imitate Christ in their work and lives.


A teacher of wisdom and faith: Sister Rosalyn O'Malley

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In the first installment of our special feature on "church ladies," Catholic women who inspire our faith, Emily Dagostino recounts her fourth grade teacher.

By guest blogger Emily Dagostino.

She wore glasses over ice-blue Irish eyes, and her skin wore the look and feel of clotted cream. Her head was a small white cap atop a fleshy body. She held her still hands folded, one inside the other, in front of her belly. She carried herself and her baby-powder scent in striped button-down shirts and long straight skirts, stockings, and taupe rubber-soled loafers.


Celebrating Mardi Gras AND International Women's Day

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In a weird confluence, the 100th International Women’s Day falls on Mardi Gras this year. We editors realized this as we ate punchkis together and titled our upcoming interview with anthropologist and former Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, on his study of American Muslims.

While we may be embracing the “fat” of “fat” Tuesday in our office, Mardi Gras has come to mean something completely different in American culture: getting drunk and flaunting sexuality, devoid of the fasting that follows.


Concluding with Joyce Rupp

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A quick thanks to all the women who contributed guest blog post on our prompt: "How do you keep the faith as a woman in the church?"

The response was tremendous, and we look forward to continuing to hear from you in our comments and in future guest blog post opportunities. We had women from their 20s to their 80s contributing—some of them cradle Catholics and others who joined the church later in life. Everyone from people without parish homes to nuns—mothers, ministers, theologians, writers, readers—shared their perspectives.


From doubt to faith to doubt

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A former agnostic still has hesitations about the church, though it helped lead her to belief.

I want to be a parish lady

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A young woman’s admiration for those who care for the church set her ambitions as a Catholic.

A human church

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The difficulties of being in the church aren’t necessarily a bad thing, theologian Diana Hayes writes.

Mary and Mass

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A Catholic woman connects with the feminine side of God, even if it’s not often acknowledged in church.

Baptismal faith

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In witnessing Baptisms, a cradle Catholic remembers her own baptismal identity.

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