Converted churches

Megan Sweas| comments | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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As a full-time volunteer after college, I lived in a convent converted into the volunteer program’s offices. Across the street was an old church (not Catholic) that was being converted into condos. Despite the fact that we were living in a convent, my roommates and I argued whether we would want to buy a home in an old church—sacred or profane?

With churchs sadly closing, it seems that more are being converted to something else rather being torn down. Here’s a link to some unique rehabs (thank to Neatorama).

If a church is no longer going to be a church, I would prefer it to be a book store, library, school, or something like that. It’s sad to see church’s becoming nightclubs and bars.

Speaking of churches, here is a list of “10 divinely designed churches” from Neatorama, and “the 10 most amazing temples in the world.”

Ten it seems, isn't enough. This website lists a total of 40 unique churches in two parts. These are fascinating to see, and you may even find a church in driving distance of you. I've passed by St. Joseph Ukrainian Catholic Church in Chicago, IL many times. With its 13 gold domes, it's definitely a landmark.

Do you have an architecturally interesting or favorite church near you?

My brother just took me by a "green" synagogue in Evanston last weekend--very neat building. Krista Tippet spoke about architecture on Speaking of Faith a few weeks ago, including about a church that was reconstructed using parts of the old church.