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<p>
Thank you for taking the time to take this month&#39;s poll.
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<p>
In this month&#39;s <a href="/translations">Sounding Board survey</a>, Bishop Donald W. Trautman argues that the new translation of the Missal is incomprehensible. Read about the changes and tell us how they sound to you.
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<h5><a href="/translations">Please take our entire survey on the new translations of the Roman Missal by clicking here.</a> </h5>
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The results will appear in the July 2010 issue of <em>U.S. Catholic</em>. <a href="https://www.cambeywest.com/usc/uscpaids.asp" target="_blank">Order your copy today! </a>
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<p>
<a href="/poll">Take other polls here.</a>
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Comments

Submitted by The_Truth (not verified) on

"you absolutely have to respect ours...Let US decide what we should or shouldn't want."

That's amazingly selfish of you. Do unto others as you'd want them to do unto you.

Jack has every right to his wishes as you do. The Church is about the entire congregation, not just the vocal majority.

Peace.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

How true! The younger generation only wants something "different." After having to put up with the Latin Mass until I was 15, I wouldn't attend a Latin Mass for anything. (I also studied Latin.) Why should those of us who prefer to pray with the priest rather than rattle our rosary beads, daydream, listen to a music recital of Gregorian chant, or read personal novenas, give up our right to PRAYING the Mass in the vernacular?

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

The younger generation wants authentic Roman liturgy, not modernist constructs that alienate our heritage. The younger generation wants a liturgy that is uplifting and sacred, a liturgy that has language, sacramentals that lift the senses to heaven, to the underlying reality of the Eucharist, NOT something that is common and banal.

If you do not know what the prayers of the Mass are, at least *generally*, then you have not done your homework. In fifteen years - especially with studying Latin - I would certainly hope that you know what the priest was saying and doing throughout the entire Mass.

Submitted by Dennis (not verified) on

How old are you? are you speaking for yourself or others?
I can tell you, and here I am speaking for others, that I have three children ages 21, 19 and 18 and they want their progressive, intellectually alive, socially active church back. They want none of the great leap backward currently being pushed down from the top.

Submitted by Bill (not verified) on

I wonder if the editors were expecting that outcome, given how poorly and suggestively they worded this poll. :-)

Let us maintain and restore the tradition and sacred liturgy of our Church Fathers and the faithful who have gone before us; and let us pray for those who not only dissent from the Pope, our Holy Father, but also seek to create schisms within Holy Mother Church over "traditions" that have been around for a paltry 40 years.

Give us back our Latin!

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

The translations thus far have been HORRIBLE!!! I think people who want the Mass in the Vernacular nevertheless want authentic liturgy. The "Spirit of VII" strikes everyone I know as made-up. Better translations, without spin are needed. Latin is not for everyone but unites the Church.

Submitted by adeodatus (not verified) on

Bishop Trautman, stop trying to dumb us down. Raise the bar. Stop trying to throw the children's food to dogs. The Latin contains riches. A better translation is needed than the "see Dick and Jane" "dynamic equivalency" that exists now. Don't water down of the rich tradition that flows from Christ's side. Pun intended.

Submitted by AJW (not verified) on

I'm not sure why the options are either a)literal translation, or b)easy to understand. Latin and English actually share a lot of grammatical constructs. It's not that hard to make a Latin translation both accurate AND understandable.

Submitted by The_Truth (not verified) on

Or why they can't have BOTH types of masses? In the Church I was brought up with, they had one mass in Latin, two masses that were "regular" and one mass that was constructed especially for the kids that attended their elementary school, junior high and high school.

In the younger Mass, the priest would talk about Jesus ascending into Heaven in terminology like "a tractor beam from Star Trek" and the kids "got it." The music was young and hip, they had the kids actively partake in parts of the Mass, etc. In fact, that Mass became so popular they switched their Saturday Mass to do the same. On Sunday, the Mass became so inundated with people that it was standing room only, so they converted one of the other Sunday Masses to the same format. People loved it because they could actually relate to it.

The Latin Mass was never full and consisted mostly of senior citizens.

But there is no reason why the CC can't think outside of the box and cater to both.

Cheers!

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