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Thank you for taking the time to take this month&#39;s poll.
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<p>
In this month&#39;s <a href="/translations">Sounding Board survey</a>, Bishop Donald W. Trautman argues that the new translation of the Missal is incomprehensible. Read about the changes and tell us how they sound to you.
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<h5><a href="/translations">Please take our entire survey on the new translations of the Roman Missal by clicking here.</a> </h5>
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The results will appear in the July 2010 issue of <em>U.S. Catholic</em>. <a href="https://www.cambeywest.com/usc/uscpaids.asp" target="_blank">Order your copy today! </a>
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<a href="/poll">Take other polls here.</a>
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Comments

Submitted by mags (not verified) on

How can people really want Latin, unless it is for a community who have studied and have understanding of it. If I speak to you in your mother tongue you will know what I mean - if we both speak in a language we have had to learn we are going to struggle with emphasis and finding the right words. The Mass should speak to the heart of those who attend - that means using the words they know, not words they have had to learn for this one event.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Agreed

Submitted by Don Vanden Burgt (not verified) on

I doubt if many will notice the change because most don't seem to pay attention to them now. The only thing that will make them notice is if they take more time; which I am willing to bet on.(Has anyone done a word count - it may make an interesting article.) As that famous Chicago parish priest, Andrew Greeley, said in one of his memoirs, "I never met a liturgist who couldn't improve a liturgy by making it slower and longer."

Don

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

"As that famous Chicago parish priest, Andrew Greeley..." The more accurate words to describe him would be infamous Chicago author...

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Read Michael Davies' 'Pope John's Council' and you will see how the Fathers at Vatican II did NOT think that they were voting for the entire Mass to be said in the venacular. They only parts parts of the Mass in the venacular but the Canon to remain in Latin as well as other parts of the Mass. This "time bomb" was engineered by a faction of Dutch and German Bishops--the so called Rhine group--who wanted to reform the Catholic Mass a la Luther's Mass. Obviously, this group won. They destroyed the Mass. This was evident when the time bombs exploded and the entire Mass went from Latin to the venacular--the Council Fathers did NOT want this. They were hoodwinked by Protestant-leaning modernists who wanted to strip Catholicism bare.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

News Flash: Latin Is A Dead Language.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Because Latin is a "dead language", it does not lend itself to be altered, or ad libbed, or changed over centuries. We've had enough of the "lets make Mass relevant" we need to get back to Truth that doesn't change based on the culture around us.

Submitted by ralph ranieri (not verified) on

I cannot believe that so many people want a Latin Mass. Neither can I believe that we are getting into conspiracy theories about Vatican II and the "Rhine group." Have any of the liturgists looked around at mass lately. From the looks I see on faces in church, Mass does not seem to be registering with people. People are leaning agains doors, guarding aisles seats for fast get-aways, reading bulletins and we are trying to make things a little more remote for them by doing it all in Latin. This is like saying sermons are boring, so let's make them longer, which has been done. How about sending a rescue team to the people dying in the pews, instead of Latin?

Submitted by John Drake (not verified) on

Ralph, your observations on the state of the Novus Ordo are precisely why many of us yearn for the celebration in Latin. The current English translation is so bland and non-sacral, no wonder folks are bored. The new English translation will be a vast improvement, but the Mass is intended to be in Latin.

Submitted by Qualis Rex (not verified) on

This is such a no-brainer.

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