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Thank you for taking the time to take this month&#39;s poll.
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<p>
In this month&#39;s <a href="/translations">Sounding Board survey</a>, Bishop Donald W. Trautman argues that the new translation of the Missal is incomprehensible. Read about the changes and tell us how they sound to you.
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<h5><a href="/translations">Please take our entire survey on the new translations of the Roman Missal by clicking here.</a> </h5>
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The results will appear in the July 2010 issue of <em>U.S. Catholic</em>. <a href="https://www.cambeywest.com/usc/uscpaids.asp" target="_blank">Order your copy today! </a>
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<a href="/poll">Take other polls here.</a>
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Comments

Submitted by ioannes (not verified) on

U.S. Catholic insists on a civil and respectful dialogue on our website, following our Terms of Use. Comments should be charitable, on topic, and brief. U.S. Catholic reserves the right to delete comments deemed inappropriate. We encourage you to choose your words wisely, allowing all visitors have their say.

Submitted by The_Truth (not verified) on

"Beam me up Scotty! Worst example I've ever heard of the Ascension. No wonder we are where we are."

Amazingly, when the particular priest who was the "mastermind" of this left the parish to go to another parish, the attendance plummeted once the Pastor slowly reverted back to the "old" ways. I'm talking about almost cut in half after a year or so after the priest left.

To you, the Star Trek example is a joke, but to a young child who doesn't even have the word "Ascension" in their lexicon it is meaningful because it provides a common frame of reference. Language is about communication... communicating means "understanding," not simply throwing around "big words" to appear to be impressive.

Perhaps we should get rid of Sesame Street as well and replace it with PhD's talking to kids with all of their fancy jargon about the same topics. I bet that would go over well.

Peace.

Submitted by michael jaquith (not verified) on

Latin is our rich heritage. We have had missals with the latin on one page and the english tranlation, not tranliteration on the opposite page. This worked for decades prior to the change in the Mass and the bad translation that was the only option in the liturgy.

Submitted by Tom Webb (not verified) on

Latin may be our rich heritage but prior to the council the pews were filled with LOL's praying the rosary during the Eucharistic prayer....

Sorry, it makes no sense to return to Latin prayers in the liturgy. The people must understand what they are praying for / about.

My greater concern is that somehow as if by magic people think returning to the Latin mass will increase reverence. Reverence is not increased by ignorance of a language, nor an inability to understand what is being prayed for.

Lack of reverence comes from a host of other things including a poor sense of liturgy, the inability of a people to value silence and a meditative atmosphere and the need to take seriously the suggestions of good liturgists who argue that what has been lost is the value of liturgical actions. Bowing before receiving the eucharist is one way to emphasize reverence.

Putting up altar rails, forbidding the reception of communion in the hand and concern for who washes liturgical vessels doesn't....

Submitted by Haskell Catholic (not verified) on

Friends, let us not throw away the teachings of the most recent Council of the Universal Church. We should follow the guidelines of The Constitution of Sacred Liturgy (Sacrocanctum Concilium) in paragraphs 36 and 54. Excerpts follow:

#36 "The use of the Latin language, with due respect to particular law, is to be preserved in the Latin rites."

#54 "A suitable place may be allotted to the vernacular in Masses which are celebrated with the people... Nevertheless, care must be taken to ensure that the faithful may also be able to say or sing together in Latin those parts of the Ordinary of the Mass which pertain to them."

Now friends, have we implemented the "spirit" of these statements? I think not! Rather, we have taken the exception and made it the rule. We have taken liberties with the authoritative documents of an inspired council and run roughshod over the teachings of Holy Mother Church. WHY? To avoid "confusing" words like "ineffable"? How pitiful.

Pax

Submitted by William (not verified) on

... I place all my trust in the WORD. The Spirit of the Council is about updating and being open to the modern world -- here and now. Also, ineffable is a great word!

I would love to see an Easter Vigil Mass in the vernacular. The Easter Vigil Mass is an awesome Mass. However, since there is only one vigil Mass for Easter, many pastors opt for multilingual Easter Vigil Mass. Thus it is nearly impossible to find a Mass that is entirely in English. This is not an improvement over Latin. Latin is the universal language for the Latin Rite, and so if I have to learn another language, I would prefer that it be a language that is used throughout the Church, that I could find throughout the world no matter what local language is spoken

Latin is one of the few sacred languages. Exorcists have said that, in virtue of this fact, the demons tremble at the use of Latin during the rite of exorcism, and it has a more powerful effect than that of the vernacular. The vernacular has *always* been available to the laity in the Mass--in the printed missals that translated the Latin liturgy on one page, with the Latin on the other. And for those who might be too young to read, what's wrong with a sense of sacred mystery at the Mass?

Submitted by Scott (not verified) on

But Jesus, Peter, Paul, etc. spoke Aramaic and Greek. Why not have a liturgy in the languages of the savior and his followers? I hear the Latin language and wish I'd been taught it--it's so beautiful. But I don't understand this desire to use the language of the Roman Empire when the language of the New Testament in its most original form is Greek.

Submitted by JP (not verified) on

U.S. Catholic insists on a civil and respectful dialogue on our website, following our Terms of Use. Comments should be charitable, on topic, and brief. U.S. Catholic reserves the right to delete comments deemed inappropriate. We encourage you to choose your words wisely, allowing all visitors have their say.

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